July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
An Optically Equivalent Physical Eye Model for In-Vitro Assessment of Intraocular Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James George Panos
    Research and Development, Brien Holden Vision Institute, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Arthur Ho
    Research and Development, Brien Holden Vision Institute, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Klaus Ehrmann
    Research and Development, Brien Holden Vision Institute, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ravi Chandra Bakaraju
    Research and Development, Brien Holden Vision Institute, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   James Panos, Brien Holden Vision Institute (E); Arthur Ho, Brien Holden Vision Institute (E); Klaus Ehrmann, Brien Holden Vision Institute (E), US8814356 B2/Brien Holden Vision Insitute (P); Ravi Bakaraju, Brien Holden Vision Institute (E), US8814356 B2/Brien Holden Vision Insitute (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 3701. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      James George Panos, Arthur Ho, Klaus Ehrmann, Ravi Chandra Bakaraju; An Optically Equivalent Physical Eye Model for In-Vitro Assessment of Intraocular Lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):3701.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : A physical model eye system (MES) and its established methods of use has previously been reported for analysing the optical performance of soft contact lenses (Bakaraju et al, 2010). The aim of current work was to further enhance the MES’s utility to facilitate evaluation of intraocular lenses (IOLs).

Methods : The MES was enhanced to include three modules; the model eye (ME), point spread function (PSF) and Star/USAF Resolution Target (RT) arms. The MES upgrade also includes a modular anterior chamber comprising; a cornea made in PMMA — with various spherical aberration (SA) levels — seated in a sclera, metallic 3, 4 and 5 mm pupils, and a 3D printed IOL holder. A 3D printed shroud was used to house the sclera, which also facilitates operation using a cam-locking mechanism to secure the abovementioned modular components. The posterior chamber of the ME, unaltered in this version, constitutes the ‘retina’ — a high-resolution monochrome camera — which can translate along the optical axis to simulate ametropia. The ME assembly is filled with milli-Q water to mimic the humours. A selection of monochromatic filters are used to vary the light source. Both PSF and RT arms control object vergences (from -3D to +3D in 0.1D steps) via a tele-centric Badal set-up. Custom software controls all hardware functions of MES. Post processing software developed in Matlab provide through-focus (TF) PSF and MTF results. Commercial and proprietary IOLs were evaluated to demonstrate utility of the enhanced MES. TF-USAFT images were also outputted for subjective assessment.

Results : Custom IOLs tested twice on the MES on different days, under same conditions, demonstrated reproducibility as shown in Fig. 1; which shows graphs of TF-PSF — a 3D graph whereby light intensity is plotted against object vergence and the transverse width of the point spread.
Under similar test conditions, the MES TF-PSF performed comparably to a commercial instrument, the LambdaX PMTF, for a Tecnis Symfony IOL (Fig. 2).

Conclusions : A MES that is optically equivalent to the human eye was devised for testing IOLs. Preclinical testing of IOLs is vitally important but appropriate systems have been considered too complex to build and often adopt simplified optics as is prescribed in ISO standards. Here we have presented an efficient, versatile and reliable alternative.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Figure 1: MES performance reproducibility

Figure 1: MES performance reproducibility

 

Figure 2: MES vs PMTF comparable TF performance

Figure 2: MES vs PMTF comparable TF performance

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