July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Non-liquefaciens and osloensis are the Predominant Moraxella species of Ocular Infections as Determined by DNA sequencing, MALDI-TOF MS, and Biolog ID System.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Regis P Kowalski
    Ophthalmology/Microbiology, Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Samantha LaCroce
    Ophthalmology/Microbiology, Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Mollie Wilson
    Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • John Romanowski
    Ophthalmology/Microbiology, Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Jeff Newman
    Biology, Lycoming College, Lycoming, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Robert M Q Shanks
    Ophthalmology/Microbiology, Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Vishal Jhanji
    Ophthalmology/Microbiology, Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Regis Kowalski, None; Samantha LaCroce, None; Mollie Wilson, None; John Romanowski, None; Jeff Newman, None; Robert Shanks, None; Vishal Jhanji, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 833. doi:
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      Regis P Kowalski, Samantha LaCroce, Mollie Wilson, John Romanowski, Jeff Newman, Robert M Q Shanks, Vishal Jhanji; Non-liquefaciens and osloensis are the Predominant Moraxella species of Ocular Infections as Determined by DNA sequencing, MALDI-TOF MS, and Biolog ID System.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):833.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Moraxella is an ocular bacterial pathogen isolated in cases of keratitis, conjunctivitis, and endophthalmitis. Although Moraxella catarrhalis is a common clinical pathogen, other species of Moraxella appear to have a more prominent role in eye infections. It is our experience that Gram-stain (brick-shaped diplobacilli) from ocular specimens, and slow growth in culture, are early indications of Moraxella ocular infection. Identifying Moraxella to species is complex and inconsistent.

Methods : In this study, bacteria consistent with Moraxella were identified to species using: 1) DNA sequencing, 2) MALDI-TOF MS, and 3) Biolog ID System. Study samples consisted of 9 ATCC Moraxella controls; 82 isolates from keratitis; 21 isolates from conjunctivitis; and 4 isolates from endophthalmitis.

Results : The ATCC controls were correctly identified using the three techniques. For keratitis, 64 (78%) were identified as nonliquefaciens, 5 (6%) as osloensis, 5 (6%) as lacunata, 1 (1.6%) as bovis, 2 (2.4%) as Acinetobacter, and 5 (6%) as No ID. For conjunctivitis, 8 (38%) were identified as osloensis, 5 (24%) as nonliquefaciens, 3 (14.3%) as Roseomonas, 2 (9.5%) as Acinetobacter, 1 as M catarrhalis (4.7%), and 2 (9.5%) as No ID. From endophthalmitis, 3 of 4 of the isolates were nonliquefaciens. Overall, nonliquefaciens and osloensis were identified in 67% (72 of 107) and 12% (13 of 107) of cases, respectively, totaling 79 % (85 of 107).

Conclusions : Our study supports that M nonliquefaciens and osloensis are key bacterial pathogens of the eye. DNA sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS can reliably identify Moraxella to species with head-to-head correlation.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

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