July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
One beam-one vessel is not true: lamina cribrosa vessel and collagen beam networks have distinct topologies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bryn Brazile
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Bin Yang
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Alexandra Gogola
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Po Lam
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Andrew Voorhees
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ian A Sigal
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Bryn Brazile, None; Bin Yang, None; Alexandra Gogola, None; Po Lam, None; Andrew Voorhees, None; Ian Sigal, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01-EY023966, R01-EY028662, T32-EY017271, P30-EY008098, and Eye and Ear Foundation of Pittsburgh
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 4275. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Bryn Brazile, Bin Yang, Alexandra Gogola, Po Lam, Andrew Voorhees, Ian A Sigal; One beam-one vessel is not true: lamina cribrosa vessel and collagen beam networks have distinct topologies. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):4275. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : It is often stated that each lamina cribrosa collagen beam contains a vessel and that all vessels are contained in a beam. We analyzed the spatial interrelation between the lamina cribrosa microvasculature and collagen beams. Specifically, we quantified the percentage of collagen beams that contain a vessel, and the number of vessels that are inside/outside of a collagen beam

Methods : The vasculature of six normal monkey eyes was labeled by perfusing lipophilic carbocyanine dyes through the carotid artery. Eyes were enucleated, and coronal cryosections through the lamina cribrosa were imaged using fluorescence and polarized light microscopy to visualize the vessels and collagen beams, respectively. The images were registered to form 3D volumes, and the beams and vessels segmented for visualization and analyzed to quantify their spatial interrelationship

Results : On average, only 22% of the collagen beams contained a vessel within (individual eyes ranged from 14% to 32%). On average, 21% of the vessels within the LC were located outside of a collagenous beam (range 13% to 36%). Thus, on average, 79% of the LC vessels were inside a beam (range 64% to 87%). Individual monkeys differed significantly in the fraction of vessels outside a beam (p<0.01 by linear mixed effect analysis), but not in the fraction of beams containing a vessel (p>0.05). Contralateral eyes were not significantly different in the fraction of beams with a vessel and vessels outside of beams (p>0.05)

Conclusions : The laminar vascular and collagenous networks are clearly distinct. The widespread notions that every lamina beam has a vessel, and all vessels are within beams are inaccurate. Up to a third of the beams did not have a vessel within. Similarly, up to a third of the lamina vessels are outside beams. We postulate that vessels outside beams may be particularly sensitive to elevated IOP

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

A) Lamina vasculature (red) and collagen (green) in a 32um thick projection. Collagen beams with no vessels (pink arrows), vessel outside beams (white arrow), vessel along the side of the beam (blue arrow), and the expected vessel through the center of a beam (yellow arrows). B) Percentage of beams with a vessel within. C) Percentage of vessels outside a beam. Bars: mean over lamina depth; error bars: SD

A) Lamina vasculature (red) and collagen (green) in a 32um thick projection. Collagen beams with no vessels (pink arrows), vessel outside beams (white arrow), vessel along the side of the beam (blue arrow), and the expected vessel through the center of a beam (yellow arrows). B) Percentage of beams with a vessel within. C) Percentage of vessels outside a beam. Bars: mean over lamina depth; error bars: SD

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×