July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Effectiveness and patient acceptance of novel immersive serious games for population eye health education.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dinesh Visva Gunasekeran
    National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
    VISRE, Singapore
  • Rebecca Low
    National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
    National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Ruvendren Gunasekeran
    Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore
    National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • Benedict Chan
    National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Hong Ya Ong
    National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Dhananjay Raje
    MDS Bioanalytics, Nagpur, India
  • Helen Mi
    National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • Quan Dong Nguyen
    Byers Eye Institute, Stanford Medicine, California, United States
  • Rupesh Vijay Agrawal
    National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
    Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Dinesh Gunasekeran, VISRE (I); Rebecca Low, None; Ruvendren Gunasekeran, None; Benedict Chan, None; Hong Ya Ong, None; Dhananjay Raje, None; Helen Mi, None; Quan Nguyen, None; Rupesh Agrawal, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Commonwealth Fellowship in Innovation award.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5436. doi:
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      Dinesh Visva Gunasekeran, Rebecca Low, Ruvendren Gunasekeran, Benedict Chan, Hong Ya Ong, Dhananjay Raje, Helen Mi, Quan Dong Nguyen, Rupesh Vijay Agrawal; Effectiveness and patient acceptance of novel immersive serious games for population eye health education.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5436.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Visual impairment (VI) is a major problem affecting over 230 million across Asia Pacific. Lack of awareness is a key driver for these high rates of VI, whereby in Singapore 72% of Glaucoma was undiagnosed. Glaucoma has a population prevalence of 2-5% reported in Asia, and in its later stages becomes a major contributor to VI. This study aims to determine whether novel immersive solutions such as virtual reality (VR) and/or augmented reality (AR) can be purposefully designed to enhance population eye health.

Methods : This is a pilot observational cohort study of patient volunteers that completed conventional counselling and eye screening. Participants utilised immersive software for population eye health education and interviews to assess their retention of key information and acceptance of these solutions. Before-after interview responses were interpreted on a 5-point latent construct to assess change in understanding of key messages.

Results : 20 patients were recruited with a mean age of 33.2 + 15.9 (range 17-68). After utilisation of these solutions, improvement in patient understanding was statistically significant for pathophysiology of glaucoma (Q1, p=0.004), effects of glaucoma (Q2, p=0.001), purpose of eye screening (p=0.001), recommended frequency of eye screening (Q4, p=0.023) and impact of peripheral vision loss (Q5, p=0.012) using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Most patients (86.7%, n=13/15) indicated they are willing to use VR and/or AR to better understand eye diseases.

Conclusions : This study found that immersive solutions may effectively facilitate greater awareness about glaucoma and eye screening to facilitate early detection of eye diseases.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Figure 1: Users are engaged in an immersive mini-game that is easy to understand (A). They gain points for keeping the avatar within their visual field as it darts around in a 3-Dimensional space around the user (B). It incorporates progressive visual field deficits in game play (B) requiring the user to find gems (C) to recover their vision and continue playing, along with embedded educational messages (D) at key junctures.

Figure 1: Users are engaged in an immersive mini-game that is easy to understand (A). They gain points for keeping the avatar within their visual field as it darts around in a 3-Dimensional space around the user (B). It incorporates progressive visual field deficits in game play (B) requiring the user to find gems (C) to recover their vision and continue playing, along with embedded educational messages (D) at key junctures.

 

Figure 2: Sankey plot diagrams for survey results.

Figure 2: Sankey plot diagrams for survey results.

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