July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
MOTION-RESOLVED 3D MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE HUMAN EYE
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benedetta Franceschiello
    Ophthalmology, Fondation Asile des Aveugles, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
    Radiology, CHUV, Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
  • Lorenzo Di Sopra
    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Silvio Ionta
    Department of Ophthalmology-University of Lausanne, Fondation Asile des Aveugles, Sensory-Motor Lab (SeMoLa), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • David Zeugin
    Department of Ophthalmology-University of Lausanne, Fondation Asile des Aveugles, Sensory-Motor Lab (SeMoLa), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Michael Notter
    Radiology, CHUV, Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
  • Jessica A. M. Bastiaansen
    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • João Jorge
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Jérôme Yerly
    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Lausanne, Switzerland
    Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Matthias Stuber
    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Lausanne, Switzerland
    Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Micah Murray
    Radiology, CHUV, Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
    Ophthalmology, Fondation Asile des Aveugles, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Benedetta Franceschiello, None; Lorenzo Di Sopra, None; Silvio Ionta, None; David Zeugin, None; Michael Notter, None; Jessica Bastiaansen, None; João Jorge, None; Jérôme Yerly, None; Matthias Stuber, Siemens Healthcare (S); Micah Murray, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  SEER RR2000
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6112. doi:
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      Benedetta Franceschiello, Lorenzo Di Sopra, Silvio Ionta, David Zeugin, Michael Notter, Jessica A. M. Bastiaansen, João Jorge, Jérôme Yerly, Matthias Stuber, Micah Murray; MOTION-RESOLVED 3D MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE HUMAN EYE. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6112.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Eye-movements pose major challenges for the use of MRI techniques in ophthalmology, as they introduce motion artefacts and preclude the applicability of standard procedures in the clinic. We ideated and tested a MR imaging framework that demonstrates the feasibility of motion-tracking and retrospective motion-resolved 3D isotropic image reconstruction of the eye dynamics.

Methods : Data were acquired from N=3 healthy adult volunteers on a 3T clinical MRI scanner (MAGNETOM Prismafit, Siemens Healthcare AG), using a prototype uninterrupted gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequence with lipid-insensitive binomial off-resonant RF excitation (LIBRE) for fat suppression. The acquisition used a 3D radial phyllotaxis sampling pattern with spiral trajectories rotated by the golden-angle for uniform k-space coverage. The field-of view was (192mm)3 with 1mm3 isotropic resolution. Eye movements were tracked using an eye-tracking system (EyeLink 1000Plus) synchronized with the MRI scanner via Syncbox (NordicNeuroLab). Sixteen distinct visual stimuli (gray circle at different positions on a black background) were presented to each volunteer. Each stimulus had a duration of 5 seconds and was repeated 6 times during the experiment, for a total of 96 trials opportunely randomized to ensure uniform sampling distribution of the readouts in k-space. The post-processed Eye-tracker data were used for binning the time intervals of each motion state and to match the k-space readouts corresponding to the same stimulus presentation. Motion-resolved 5D image reconstruction (x-y-z-α-β dimensions, where α and β represent the eye angular rotations in the up-down and left-right directions) was performed using a k-t sparse SENSE algorithm exploiting sparsity both along the α and β directions (Fig. 1).

Results : 3D motion-resolved images of the eye with 1mm3 isotropic resolution were successfully acquired and reconstructed in all volunteers. Eye-motions across the presentation of the different visual stimuli were clearly reconstructed (Fig. 2) void of motion artifacts.

Conclusions : The proposed protocol allows the tracking and retrospective resolving of eye motions to overcome the limitations of standardized eye-acquisitions using MRI. Future developments of the protocol might challenge the major hurdle for MRI in ophthalmology, which may open new directions in clinical as well as fundamental visual neuroscience research.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

 

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