July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Effects of horizontal eye movement and contact lens decentration on horizontal peripheral refraction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Atchison
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innov, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
  • durgasri Jaisankar
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innov, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
  • Kate Gifford
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innov, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
  • Alexander Leube
    Institute for Ophthalmic Research, Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Barden-Wuerrtemberg, Germany
    Carl Zeiss Vision International GmbH, Aalen, Barden-Wuerrtemberg, Germany
  • Katrina L Schmid
    Institute of Health and Biomedical Innov, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Queensland, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   David Atchison, None; durgasri Jaisankar, None; Kate Gifford, Coopervision (R), Visioneering Technologies (R); Alexander Leube, Carl Zeiss Vision (E); Katrina Schmid, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6373. doi:https://doi.org/
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      David A. Atchison, durgasri Jaisankar, Kate Gifford, Alexander Leube, Katrina L Schmid; Effects of horizontal eye movement and contact lens decentration on horizontal peripheral refraction. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6373. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Peripheral refraction is often measured by rotating the eye to gaze at a range of target positions. Contact lenses decentration on the eye during eye rotations may alter refraction measurements. We investigated the influence of contact lens decentration on peripheral refraction in the horizontal field.

Methods : Right eyes of 6 participants (2 emmetropes, 4 myopes) underwent cycloplegic peripheral refraction, using a Grand-Seiko WAM-5500 Autorefractor, along the horizontal visual field to ±35° eccentricities. Targets at a range of positions were fixated using either eye rotation only or head rotation only. Refraction was obtained without correction, with Proclear single vision lenses (CooperVision), with Proclear multifocal centre-distance aspheric lenses with +2.50D add (CooperVision), and with NaturalVue aspheric lenses (Visioneering Tech.). Photographs of eyes during lens wear were taken at each eye rotation; positive values indicated on-eye lens decentration nasally or superiorly. Peripheral refraction was compared between eye and head rotations for each eccentricity/lens combination using Student’s t-test, and repeated measures ANOVAs evaluated effects of eye/head rotation, lens condition (excluding without-correction) and eccentricity on peripheral refraction.

Results : Horizontal ranges across the 70° visual field were ≈1.3±0.3mm for Proclear single vision and multifocal lenses, but were significantly smaller at 0.6±0.3mm for NaturalVue lenses (Fig. 1). The lenses produced different changes in peripheral refraction patterns (Fig. 2), but there were no significant differences in refraction between eye and head rotation at any eccentricity/lens combination. ANOVAs also showed no significant differences between eye and head rotation, but results for the single vision lens were significantly different from those for other lenses (p≤0.002).

Conclusions : Upon eye rotation the contact lenses decentered on the eye, but not enough to have significant effects upon peripheral refraction. For the lens types assessed, it is valid to use eye rotations to investigate peripheral refraction, at least for the horizontal visual field.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Fig. 1. Contact lens decentration as function of peripheral eccentricity for eye rotation (error bars are 95% CIs of means)

Fig. 1. Contact lens decentration as function of peripheral eccentricity for eye rotation (error bars are 95% CIs of means)

 

Fig. 2. Peripheral refraction as function of peripheral eccentricity for different lenses and for eye or head rotation (error bars are 95% CIs of means)

Fig. 2. Peripheral refraction as function of peripheral eccentricity for different lenses and for eye or head rotation (error bars are 95% CIs of means)

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