July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Gait Patterns in Severe Peripheral Field Loss due to Retinitis Pigmentosa
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joshua R Ehrlich
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • Abigail Kumagai
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Yooree Chung
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Andrew Chen
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Phuoc Nguyen
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • Sherry Day
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Donna Wicker
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Ashley Howson
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Shirin E Hassan
    School of Optometry, Indiana University, Indiana, United States
  • David C Musch
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • James D Weiland
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • Sayoko Eileen Moroi
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • Lauro Ojeda
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Michigan, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Joshua Ehrlich, None; Abigail Kumagai, None; Yooree Chung, None; Andrew Chen, None; Phuoc Nguyen, None; Sherry Day, None; Donna Wicker, None; Ashley Howson, None; Shirin Hassan, None; David Musch, None; James Weiland, None; Sayoko Moroi, Bausch and Lomb (C); Lauro Ojeda, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Pilot grant to JRE from the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research funded by NIH/NCATS (UL1TR000433); National Eye Institute (K23EY027848) to JRE; Ratner Foundation; an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness to the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 1048. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Joshua R Ehrlich, Abigail Kumagai, Yooree Chung, Andrew Chen, Phuoc Nguyen, Sherry Day, Donna Wicker, Ashley Howson, Shirin E Hassan, David C Musch, James D Weiland, Sayoko Eileen Moroi, Lauro Ojeda; Gait Patterns in Severe Peripheral Field Loss due to Retinitis Pigmentosa. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):1048.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Peripheral field loss (PFL) can adversely impact mobility. However, the effect of severe PFL on specific gait parameters has not been well-described. Gait parameters could serve as novel outcome measures for future studies to evaluate interventions for improving mobility in severe PFL. Using data from a pilot clinical trial, we sought to compare gait patterns in participants with severe PFL due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and controls.

Methods : Participants were recruited from the Kellogg Eye Center who had RP, presenting visual acuity >20/60 in both eyes, and a maximum horizontal extent of 20° on the III4e isopter of the Goldmann visual field (GVF). Controls had a normal eye exam and visual acuity ≥20/25 in both eyes and were matched to participants based on age and sex. Inertial measurement units (IMU; Actigraph GT9X) were fit to each foot and to a headband worn around the forehead while participants walked roundtrip down a 30.8-meter hallway free of obstacles. Gyroscope and accelerometer data from IMUs was used to recreate the 3-dimensional kinematic trajectories of the feet as participants moved down the hallway. From foot trajectories we calculated lateral and forward stride variability. The Student’s t-test was used for statistical analyses.

Results : We included data from 7 participants with RP (mean age 27.4 years, 29% female) and 7 controls. Among participants with RP, mean visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR and the GVF was 14.9 degrees in the better-seeing eye. Figure 1 illustrates the forward and lateral stride variability for one participant in the study. Figure 2 depicts stride variability comparing all RP and control participants. The mean lateral stride variability was 0.15 m and 0.12 m for RP and controls (p=0.09), respectively. The mean forward stride variability was 0.07 m and 0.05 m for RP and controls, respectively (p=0.16).

Conclusions : There was a statistically non-significant trend toward greater lateral and forward stride variability among participants with RP compared to controls. Future studies with larger samples and more challenging walking courses could reveal meaningful differences in gait parameters that could serve as novel outcomes for future clinical studies to improve mobility in severe PFL.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Stride variability for one participant in the study. The eclipse highlights the variability in this inidvidual's strides.

Stride variability for one participant in the study. The eclipse highlights the variability in this inidvidual's strides.

 

Stride variability comparing retinitis pigmentosa and controls.

Stride variability comparing retinitis pigmentosa and controls.

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