July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Outcomes and Complications of Hyperbaric Oxygen in the Treatment of Central Retinal Artery Occlusion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samuel D. Hobbs
    Ophthalmology, San Antonio Military Health System, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Gregory Bryant Giles
    Ophthalmology, San Antonio Military Health System, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Aditya Mehta
    Ophthalmology, San Antonio Military Health System, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Marissa Weber
    Ophthalmology, San Antonio Military Health System, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Samuel Hobbs, None; Gregory Giles, None; Aditya Mehta, None; Marissa Weber, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 4058. doi:
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      Samuel D. Hobbs, Gregory Bryant Giles, Aditya Mehta, Marissa Weber; Outcomes and Complications of Hyperbaric Oxygen in the Treatment of Central Retinal Artery Occlusion. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):4058.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To present four cases of central retinal artery occlusion that were treated with hyperbaric oxygen, including their long-term visual acuities and complications.

Methods : This is a retrospective observational case series in a single-center setting. Patients were included who were diagnosed with a non-arteritic central retinal artery occlusion, treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and followed for at least one year. Initial and final visual acuities were recorded, as well as risk factors for ocular neovascular disease.

Results : Four patients were diagnosed with non-arteritic central retinal artery occlusion and subsequently treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two patients with a history of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus developed early-onset ocular neovascularization following treatment, with final visual outcomes of hand motion. One patient with diabetes and non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and one patient without diabetes, did not develop ocular neovascularization, and both had improvement in final visual acuity.

Conclusions : Patients undergoing hyperbaric oxygen therapy for central retinal artery occlusion may require closer monitoring for ocular neovascularization. Further research is needed to determine the long-term safety of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, especially in the setting of diabetes or other conditions that may increase the risk for ocular neovascularization and poorer visual outcomes.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Figure 1. A. Right fundus photo of the patient in Case 2, upon initial presentation, demonstrating retinal whitening and a cherry red macula without visualization of emboli, consistent with a diagnosis of central retinal artery occlusion. B. The left fundus photo of the same patient, demonstrating a normal fundus without evidence of diabetic retinopathy.

Figure 1. A. Right fundus photo of the patient in Case 2, upon initial presentation, demonstrating retinal whitening and a cherry red macula without visualization of emboli, consistent with a diagnosis of central retinal artery occlusion. B. The left fundus photo of the same patient, demonstrating a normal fundus without evidence of diabetic retinopathy.

 

Figure 2. Fluorescein angiography of the patient presented in Case 2, revealing remarkable slowing of dye flow in the right eye.

Figure 2. Fluorescein angiography of the patient presented in Case 2, revealing remarkable slowing of dye flow in the right eye.

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