July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Isolated human crystalline lens spherical aberration: Experimental measurements and predictions from OCT-based geometry
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashik Mohamed
    Ophthalmic Biophysics, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Siobhan Williams
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Eduardo Martinez-Enriquez
    Visual Optics and Biophotonics Lab, Institute of Optics, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain
  • Alberto De Castro
    Visual Optics and Biophotonics Lab, Institute of Optics, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain
  • Marco Ruggeri
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Bianca Maceo Heilman
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Yu-Cherng Chang
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • N. Geetha Sravani
    Ophthalmic Biophysics, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Cornelis Rowaan
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Alex Gonzalez
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Shravya Sri Durgam
    Ophthalmic Biophysics, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Arthur Ho
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Robert C Augusteyn
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jean-Marie Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Susana Marcos
    Visual Optics and Biophotonics Lab, Institute of Optics, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain
  • Fabrice Manns
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ashik Mohamed, None; Siobhan Williams, None; Eduardo Martinez-Enriquez, US20170316571A1 (P); Alberto De Castro, None; Marco Ruggeri, None; Bianca Maceo Heilman, None; Yu-Cherng Chang, None; N. Geetha Sravani, None; Cornelis Rowaan, None; Alex Gonzalez, None; Shravya Durgam, None; Arthur Ho, None; Robert Augusteyn, None; Jean-Marie Parel, None; Susana Marcos, US20170316571A1 (P), WO/2012/146811 (P); Fabrice Manns, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Eye Institute Grants 1F30EY027162, 2R01EY021834, P30EY14801 (Center Grant); the Australian Federal Government CRC Scheme through the Vision Cooperative Research Centre; the Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation; Florida Lions Eye Bank and the Beauty of Sight Foundation; Drs KR Olsen and ME Hildebrandt; Drs R Urs and A Furtado; the Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP); an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, European Research Council ERC-AdG 294099 and CSIC iCoop Program.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 598. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ashik Mohamed, Siobhan Williams, Eduardo Martinez-Enriquez, Alberto De Castro, Marco Ruggeri, Bianca Maceo Heilman, Yu-Cherng Chang, N. Geetha Sravani, Cornelis Rowaan, Alex Gonzalez, Shravya Sri Durgam, Arthur Ho, Robert C Augusteyn, Jean-Marie Parel, Susana Marcos, Fabrice Manns; Isolated human crystalline lens spherical aberration: Experimental measurements and predictions from OCT-based geometry. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):598.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To investigate age-related changes to the geometry and optical properties of the isolated human crystalline lenses and understand the sources of spherical aberration (SA).

Methods : A combined ray tracing aberrometry–OCT system (Ruggeri et al, Biomed Opt Express 2018;9:3834-51) was used to perform experiments on 58 human donor lenses (age: newborn – 56 yrs). The probing beam was sequentially delivered using a raster scan (6 x 6 mm; 0.5 mm spacing). The incident rays were centered on the lens apex. A camera captured the exit rays at different axial positions. Custom software was used for the centroid detection, slope calculation and wavefront reconstruction. Zernike wavefront coefficients (SA in particular) were determined using ray slopes over a 6 mm pupil. Lens shape (anterior and posterior lens radii and asphericity, Ra, Rp, Qa, Qp and lens thickness, LT) was quantified from the OCT images by custom algorithms for image segmentation and distortion correction. For prediction, computational ray tracing (Zemax) was performed using lens OCT-based geometry and the calculated group refractive index (RI).

Results : From 0-20 years, Ra (0.07 mm/yr; r=0.58;p=0.007) increased; Qa (-0.36 yr-1; r=-0.81;p<0.0001), LT (-0.03 mm/yr; r=-0.72;p<0.0001) & Qp (-0.11 yr-1; r=-0.83;p<0.0001) decreased; Rp & RI remained constant (p>0.05). Above 20 years, Ra (0.07 mm/yr; r=0.51;p=0.004), Rp (0.03 mm/yr; r=0.36;p=0.04) & LT (0.02 mm/yr; r=0.72;p<0.0001) increased, RI (-0.0001 yr-1; r=-0.42;p=0.004) decreased; Qa & Qp remained constant (p>0.05). From 0-20 years, measured (m) and predicted (p) SA shifted to negative values reaching a minimum at ~20 years with different slopes (mSA: -0.0575 µm/yr; r=-0.48;p=0.03; pSA: -0.1999 µm/yr; r=-0.85;p<0.0001). Above 20 years, SA shifted towards less negative values with mSA generally more negative than pSA (mean, -0.7767 vs -0.3190), particularly in younger adults and with steeper changes with age (mSA: 0.0352 µm/yr; r=0.59;p<0.0001; pSA: 0.0241 µm/yr; r=0.40;p=0.03).

Conclusions : Changes in lens shape during childhood growth seem to produce age-related changes in lens spherical aberration that may influence emmetropization. The differences in the predicted and measured aberrations suggest an age-dependence of the contribution of shape and refractive index gradient to the lens optical properties, with GRIN playing a larger role in children and young adults.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×