July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
The effects of healthy ageing on central and peripheral motion perception
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Juan Alejandro Sepulveda
    Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  • Allison M McKendrick
    Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  • Andrew J Anderson
    Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  • Joanne M Wood
    Optometry and Vision Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Juan Sepulveda, None; Allison McKendrick, None; Andrew Anderson, None; Joanne Wood, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5919. doi:
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      Juan Alejandro Sepulveda, Allison M McKendrick, Andrew J Anderson, Joanne M Wood; The effects of healthy ageing on central and peripheral motion perception. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5919.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the effect of healthy ageing on the perception of motion at different processing levels, in central and peripheral vision.

Methods : We tested 40 visually healthy adults (20 younger [mean age 25.4 years, range 19-34] and 20 older [mean age 72.2 years, range 60-79]). Seven computer-based tasks were used to test different levels of motion perception, from lower levels (e.g. minimum dot displacement (Dmin), minimum contrast and speed to identify motion direction, and surround suppression of motion) to higher levels (e.g. global motion coherence (translational and radial), and biological motion). Each task was performed centrally and peripherally (15 deg horizontal and 5 deg vertical). For data analysis, a repeated measures two-way ANOVA was used (age x location). Additionally, Spearman correlations were used to determine relationships between the different tasks.

Results : A main effect of age was found for motion contrast (F(1,38)= 13.78, p<0.001), speed (F(1,38)= 9.44, p<0.01), Dmin (F(1,38)=36.1, p<0.001) and biological motion (F(1,38)=9.42, p<0.01), with elevated thresholds for older adults relative to younger.
A main effect of eccentricity was found for motion contrast (F(1,38)= 84.8, p<0.001), speed (F(1,38)=10.61, p<0.01), Dmin (F(1,38)=659.54, p<0.001), translational global motion coherence (F(1,38)= 5.46, p=0.02) , radial global motion coherence (F(1,38)=4.21, p= 0.047) and biological motion (F(1,38)= 136.56, p<0.001).
An age-location interaction was found for the surround suppression index (F(1,38)=7.91, p=0.008), with older adults having less suppression in central vision but more in peripheral vision.
Spearman correlation analysis also demonstrated that a number of the motion tasks were significantly associated (Table 1).

Conclusions : Apart from surround suppression, motion perception changes with age to a similar extent centrally and peripherally. These changes occur at lower levels of processing: Dmin, motion contrast and speed. Biological motion was the only more complex task affected by age and was not correlated with low-level tasks when tested peripherally, suggesting biological motion deficits in peripheral vision are not explained by lower level deficits.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Table 1. Spearman correlation coefficients between motion perception tasks. ns: p>0.05, *: p≤0.05, **: p≤0.01, ***: p≤0.001

Table 1. Spearman correlation coefficients between motion perception tasks. ns: p>0.05, *: p≤0.05, **: p≤0.01, ***: p≤0.001

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