July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Subfoveal Choroidal and Macular Retinal Thickness Changes Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography at Different Altitudes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yang Yiquan
    Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospictal, Capital Medical University, Beijing, Beijing, China
  • Ningli Wang
    Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospictal, Capital Medical University, Beijing, Beijing, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yang Yiquan, None; Ningli Wang, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 1840. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Yang Yiquan, Ningli Wang; Subfoveal Choroidal and Macular Retinal Thickness Changes Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography at Different Altitudes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):1840.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To assess changes of subfoveal choroidal and macular retinal thickness in healthy individuals during high-altitude exposure and compare those with local residents.

Methods : Subfoveal choroidal and macular retinal thickness were obtained at sea level (SL, 40 m), middle altitude (MA, 2,300 m) and high altitude (HA, 3,700 m) on 17 healthy individuals from Beijing (male: 35.3%, aged 28.06 ± 8.06 years) using SD-OCT. And then compared with 21 local dwellers from Xining (male: 50%, aged 29.64±4.25 y) and Yushu (male: 47.6%, 28.63 ± 6.00 y), respectively. Systemic and ocular parameters were also measured before and during high-altitude exposure. Data were presented as mean ± SD and analyzed using paired and independent Student t-test with significance accepted at P < 0.05.

Results : Our study included 17 participants from Beijing, 22 participants from Xining and 21 participants from Yushu (10 male and 11 female), all healthy Han subjects. During the ascent profile of Beijing Group from Beijing to Yushu, MRT did not change significantly (P=0.253), a significantly monotonous increasing trend founded in SFCT (P<0.001), pulse rate (P<0.001), diastolic pressure (P=0.001), systolic pressure (P<0.001) and OPP (P<0.001) and whereas a monotonous decreasing trend founded in SpO2 (P<0.001) and IOP (P<0.001). Comparisons at different altitudes indicated that all the three comparisons were significant in SFCT (P < 0.05). Similarly, the comparisons between the Beijing group and middle- or high-altitude dwellers demonstrated significant differences neither in SFCT nor in MRT. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and red blood cells (RBC, P<0.05).

Conclusions : Short-term exposure to high altitude induces retinal or choroidal microcirculation disturbance and auto-regulatory response in healthy individuals, which is probably attributed to RBC.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

OCT scan showing macular structure information (thickness) in various sectors. Macular retina thickness (ILM-RPE) was demonstrated in the table adjacent to the en face image.

OCT scan showing macular structure information (thickness) in various sectors. Macular retina thickness (ILM-RPE) was demonstrated in the table adjacent to the en face image.

 

Subfoveal choroidal thickness changes of Beijing Group at different altitudes. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant increases in SFCT at high altitude.* P<0.05, **P<0.001.

Subfoveal choroidal thickness changes of Beijing Group at different altitudes. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated statistically significant increases in SFCT at high altitude.* P<0.05, **P<0.001.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×