July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
In vitro biocompatibility analysis of 3D printed diatom-inspired polymer-based prototypes for intraocular drug delivery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda Salvador
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  • Jorge E. Valdez-García
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  • Judith Zavala
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  • Lilian Dávila
    Material Science and Engineering, University of California, Merced, Merced, California, United States
  • Guillermo Guerrero-Ramirez
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Brenda Salvador, None; Jorge E. Valdez-García, None; Judith Zavala, None; Lilian Dávila, None; Guillermo Guerrero-Ramirez, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Efficient Drug Delivery Devices for Sustained Eye Disease Treatment, CITRIS and the BANATAO Institute
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 3346. doi:
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      Brenda Salvador, Jorge E. Valdez-García, Judith Zavala, Lilian Dávila, Guillermo Guerrero-Ramirez; In vitro biocompatibility analysis of 3D printed diatom-inspired polymer-based prototypes for intraocular drug delivery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):3346.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Medical treatment of diseases involving the posterior segment of the eye is restricted by difficulties in the transportation of effective drug doses to the vitreous, retina and choroid. Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have proved that diatom-inspired implants are suitable for the development of intraocular drug delivery systems. Furthermore, due to their non-inflammatory and biodegradative properties, polymer-based materials are a potential compound for the development of the aforementioned implants. In this study we analyzed in vitro biocompatibility of diatom-inspired polymer-based prototypes for further use on in vivo experiments.

Methods : Four polymer-based models were evaluated: a PLGA (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) model, two PLA (polylactic acid) models (1 and 2 with different 3D printing conditions) and raw PLA pellets. Viability, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were analyzed using the CellTiter-Blue® Cell Viability Assay, Pierce™ LDH Cytotoxicity Assay and Glutathione Reductase (GR) Fluorescent Activity Kit, respectively. All assays were run in triplicate on NIH3T3 fibroblasts after a 24-hour exposure to the biomaterials. Cells were cultured in DMEM F-12 enriched with 5% fetal bovine serum and 1% streptomycin at 37°C with 5% CO2. Statistical analysis of the results was performed with a two-tailed Student’s t-test to evaluate significant differences among the biomaterials and against the control groups.

Results : Cells exposed to the PLA materials showed no significant decrease in viability compared to the control group. Cells exposed to the PLGA model exhibited a significant decrease in cell viability (p-value=0.0432). Cells exposed to the PLGA material and PLA models 1 and 2 showed no statistical difference in the LDH activity when compared to the unexposed cells, whereas PLA raw pellets showed significant cytotoxicity increase (p-value=0.004). Significant change in the GR activity of the cells exposed to the PLA raw pellets and models 1 and 2 was appreciated (p-values=0.0067, 0.0168 and 0.00004, respectively).

Conclusions : PLA model 1 demonstrated to maintain cell viability, have the lowest cytotoxicity and diminish GR activity, therefore it is considered to be the most suitable model to perform further studies using in vivo models.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Biocompatibility analysis results of fibroblastic cells cultured with diatom-inspired polymer-based materials.

Biocompatibility analysis results of fibroblastic cells cultured with diatom-inspired polymer-based materials.

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