July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
The Impact of Contact Lens Discomfort on Symptoms of Ocular Pain and Quality of Life
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Seyed Rezapour
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • M. Cuneyt Ozmen
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Gabriela Dieckmann
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • N. Dilruba Koseoglu
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Yashar Seyed-Razavi
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Cecilia Chao
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Arsia Jamali
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Ricardo Nos�
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Anam Akhlaq
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Zeina Salem
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Afsun Sahin
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Pedram Hamrah
    Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cornea Service, New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Seyed Rezapour, None; M. Cuneyt Ozmen, None; Gabriela Dieckmann, None; N. Dilruba Koseoglu, System for detecting microneuromas and methods of use thereof (P); Yashar Seyed-Razavi, None; Cecilia Chao, None; Arsia Jamali, None; Ricardo Nos�, None; Anam Akhlaq, None; Zeina Salem, None; Afsun Sahin, None; Pedram Hamrah, CooperVision (C), CooperVision (S)
  • Footnotes
    Support  CooperVision
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6338. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Seyed Rezapour, M. Cuneyt Ozmen, Gabriela Dieckmann, N. Dilruba Koseoglu, Yashar Seyed-Razavi, Cecilia Chao, Arsia Jamali, Ricardo Nos�, Anam Akhlaq, Zeina Salem, Afsun Sahin, Pedram Hamrah; The Impact of Contact Lens Discomfort on Symptoms of Ocular Pain and Quality of Life. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6338. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Contact lens discomfort (CLD) is the most common reason of decreased wearing time and discontinuation of contact lens wear (CLW), affecting the quality of life (QoL). This study aims to evaluate the impact of CLD on QoL.

Methods : In this prospective, cross-sectional, controlled, single center study, 91 subjects were recruited and divided into 5 groups: healthy controls (HC, n=18), asymptomatic CLW (ACLW, n=18), symptomatic CLW (SCLW, n=19), intolerant CLW (ICLW, n=18), and subjects with neuropathic corneal pain (NCP, n=18). Ocular pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and QoL was assessed using a validated ocular pain assessment survey (OPAS, 0-10). Only subjects with completed questionnaires (n=88) were analyzed and data are presented as mean±SD and statistical significance was defined as p<0.05.

Results : Forty-six males and 42 females, aged 39.7±13.0 years completed the study. SCLW and ICLW groups reported higher pain scores (2.3±2.9 and 2.4±2.1, respectively) compared to HC and ACLW (0.0±0.0, both) (p<0.001), which were lower, compared to pain levels in patients with NCP (5.4±2.7) (p<0.001). Assessment of QoL in SCLW and ICLW yielded higher scores, in sub-scales affecting visual function (reading/computer use (2.4±3.1, 3.1±3.3), driving/watching TV (2.2±3.0, 2.5±3.0) and mood (1.7±2.4, 2.9±3.5) compared to HC and ACLW (0.0±0.0 for both) (p<0.001), which were however lower than QoL changes in patients with NCP (p<0.01) (Table 1).

Conclusions : CLD has a significant impact on QoL in SCLW and ICLW patients. Sub-scales regarding visual function and mood are affected the most.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Table 1. Comparison of sub-scales of QoL dimension of OPAS. (*: p<0.05 compared to HC, †: p<0.05 compared to ACLW, ‡: p<0.05 compared to SCLW, #: p<0.05 compared to ICLW)

Table 1. Comparison of sub-scales of QoL dimension of OPAS. (*: p<0.05 compared to HC, †: p<0.05 compared to ACLW, ‡: p<0.05 compared to SCLW, #: p<0.05 compared to ICLW)

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×