July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Clinical Application of Optical Coherence Elastography for Corneal Biomechanics
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael D Twa
    Optometry and Vision Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Gongpu Lan
    Optometry and Vision Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
    Photoelectric Technology, Foshan University, Foshan, Guangdong, China
  • Salavat Aglyamov
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Kirill Larin
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States
    Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Michael Twa, None; Gongpu Lan, None; Salavat Aglyamov, None; Kirill Larin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NEI R01-EY022362; P30 EY07551; P30 EY003039
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6828. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Michael D Twa, Gongpu Lan, Salavat Aglyamov, Kirill Larin; Clinical Application of Optical Coherence Elastography for Corneal Biomechanics. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6828. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Determining the biomechanical properties of corneal and other soft tissues is a longstanding challenge and active area of research. We have previously reported non-invasive elasticity imaging techniques to estimate Young’s modulus for ocular tissues in vitro and in animal models. Here we report the application of these methods for clinical measurements of corneal biomechanical properties.

Methods : Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging was combined with micro-air pulse tissue stimulation to perform dynamic elasticity measurements in 5 eyes of 5 participants. Low-force (13 Pa) spatiotemporally discreet (150µm; 800µs) tissue stimulation produced submicron-scale tissue deformations measured over a 2.5mm2 area. Surface wave velocity was measured and used to determine tissue stiffness. These measures were compared with corneal thickness, IOP and metrics from the Ocular Response Analyzer (CRF and CH).

Results : Dynamic sub-micron corneal surface wave deformation responses were measured with excellent repeatability over a wide amplitude range (see Figure). Measured surface wave velocity ranged from 2.2 to 6.6 m/s between participants and correlated highly with IOP (r2=.58) and CRF (r2=.39), but not central corneal thickness (r2=.018).

Conclusions : Measurements of sub-micron corneal surface wave velocity enable clinical determinations of tissue stiffness in vivo with high precision. These observations will be combined with our previous results from elastography studies of corneal thickness, hydration, curvature, anisotropy, and IOP to provide a more comprehensive model of corneal biomechanics. We will use these measures in future studies to characterize the biomechanical responses of ocular tissues to disease and monitor the effects of clinical interventions, e.g. corneal cross-linking.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

Illustration of sub-micron corneal displacement amplitude (0.1 to 0.6 µm) as a function of distance (right panel). Elastic wave propagation speed (3 m/s) is computed from the observed distance/time relationship (left panel).

Illustration of sub-micron corneal displacement amplitude (0.1 to 0.6 µm) as a function of distance (right panel). Elastic wave propagation speed (3 m/s) is computed from the observed distance/time relationship (left panel).

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