June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Polyacrylonitrile implant prevents retinal photoreceptor degeneration in a mouse model of AMD
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joshua L Morgenstern
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Anthony Jones
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Anne D Strong
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Ellen Rhodes
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Eric R Williams
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Jeffrey L Olson
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Joshua Morgenstern, None; Anthony Jones, None; Anne Strong, None; Ellen Rhodes, None; Eric Williams, None; Jeffrey Olson, 2C Tech Equity (F), Genentech Clinical Reset Funding (F), Patent Application via CU Board of Regents for this Technology (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Gates Grubstake Fund
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 322. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Joshua L Morgenstern, Anthony Jones, Anne D Strong, Ellen Rhodes, Eric R Williams, Jeffrey L Olson; Polyacrylonitrile implant prevents retinal photoreceptor degeneration in a mouse model of AMD. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):322.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Complement levels have been shown to be elevated within the vitreous of patients with Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It remains unclear whether these elevated levels are an aspect of the disease or a response to it. Regardless, the increased complement levels are a sign of inflammation which leads to tissue damage. We hypothesize a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based intravitreal implant, with a high affinity for complement, will decrease intraocular complement levels and attenuate complement mediated retinal damage.

Methods : Three Complement factor h knockout mice (N=6 eyes), which have previously been shown to have elevated intraocular complement levels, as well as photoreceptor atrophy and declining retinal function, were used as a model for our study. Right eyes (N=3) were given intravitreal PAN injections, and the left eyes (N=3) were used as controls. Serial ERGs were performed on both eyes over the course of two years. Eyes were then enucleated and were prepared for H&E histology. Image Pro was used to analyze cell counts for changes in retinal morphology. A two-tailed Student’s t-test was used for statistical analysis.

Results : ERGs showed significant (p<0.05) loss of a-wave and b-wave amplitude in sham implant and age-matched controls when compared to PAN implanted eyes. H&E histology cell counts demonstrated a significant difference between the control group and the PAN treatment group outer nuclear layer (ONL) (p<0.05) and ganglion cell layers (GCL) (p<0.05) with the control group displaying significant atrophy in the both the ONL and GCL.

Conclusions : PAN implants preserved retinal function and morphology with attenuated photoreceptor atrophy. These findings suggest complement mediated retinal damage as a feature of disease pathology. This novel treatment may offer a therapeutic option for complement driven diseases such as AMD and diabetic retinopathy.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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