June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Social roles in addition to daily activities are factors associated with function in glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Livengood
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Gadi Wollstein
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Hiroshi Ishikawa
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Mengfei Wu
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Joel S Schuman
    Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Heather Livengood, None; Gadi Wollstein, None; Hiroshi Ishikawa, None; Mengfei Wu, None; Joel Schuman, Zeiss (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant R01-EY013178; Unrestricted Grant by the Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 1570. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Heather Livengood, Gadi Wollstein, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Mengfei Wu, Joel S Schuman; Social roles in addition to daily activities are factors associated with function in glaucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):1570.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Glaucoma adversely affects subjects’ ability to accomplish daily activities, engage in social roles, and contributes to disability. Yet methods to evaluate glaucoma-related disability are limited. To identify daily activities and social roles associated with glaucoma, this study (1) tests the association between visual field (VF) and the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H), a questionnaire developed to measure the degree of difficulty and the level(s) of assistance subjects require in order to accomplish daily activities and social roles, and (2) identifies LIFE-H items with high differential capability of person functional ability.

Methods : We recruited 101 subjects aged 50 years and older diagnosed with glaucoma who underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation and VF testing (Humphrey Field Analyzer, Zeiss, Dublin, CA) whom were administered the LIFE-H. Better-eye VF mean deviation (MD) was used to measure severity of visual impairment. Multivariable regression analyses determined the association between MD and 11 LIFE-H domains (totaling 37 daily activity and 38 social role items), adjusting for the covariates age, gender, race, comorbidities, and depressive symptoms. Domains not significantly associated with MD and items not applicable to 10% of subjects were excluded from further analyses, resulting in 64 qualified subjects and 40 LIFE-H items. Rasch analysis was used to determine the item hierarchical order based on the level of person ability.

Results : 64 subjects of average age 66±10 years and better-eye MD of -5.0±7.4 dB qualified for the analysis. All LIFE-H domains except interpersonal relationships were significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with MD. Overall, average domain scores were high (range, 8.7±1.5 to 9.7±0.4) with the lowest scoring domains being mobility, employment, and recreation. Of the 40 LIFE-H items, 29 were daily activities and 11 were social roles. 21 items across 6 domains were detected to have high differential capability; of which 11 items were daily activities and 10 items were social roles. 11 of the 21 items were significantly associated with MD; 8 of which were social roles and 3 daily activities.

Conclusions : The large impact of the social role items among the LIFE-H questionnaire highlight the psychosocial factors for subjects with glaucoma. Further evaluation of daily activities and social roles that constitute when and how glaucoma affects subjects is needed.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×