June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Modulation of stereopsis and sensory eye dominance by gaze direction in strabismus
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna Kosovicheva
    Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Emily Wiecek
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston Children's Hospital, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, United States
  • Melanie Kazlas
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston Children's Hospital, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, United States
  • David G Hunter
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston Children's Hospital, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, United States
  • Peter J Bex
    Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Anna Kosovicheva, None; Emily Wiecek, None; Melanie Kazlas, None; David Hunter, Luminopia, Inc (I), Luminopia, Inc (S), Rebion, Inc (I), Rebion, Inc (P); Peter Bex, None
  • Footnotes
    Support   This work was supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health (R01 EY029713 to P. J. B. and F32 EY028814 to A. K.), the Knights Templar Eye Foundation Career Starter Grant (E.W.), and the Children’s Hospital Ophthalmology Foundation Discovery Award (E.W.).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 1730. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Anna Kosovicheva, Emily Wiecek, Melanie Kazlas, David G Hunter, Peter J Bex; Modulation of stereopsis and sensory eye dominance by gaze direction in strabismus. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):1730.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Previous work has shown that gaze direction influences sensory eye dominance and stereoacuity in normally-sighted observers. On average, stereoacuity is highest for straight-ahead gaze (Schreiber et al, 2001) and observers show greater right-eye dominance at rightward gaze directions (Khan & Crawford, 2001), which could be attributed to interocular differences in retinal image size (Banks, Ghose, & Hillis, 2004). We examined whether patients with strabismus show comparable changes in binocular function at different gaze directions, and whether these variations in eye dominance and stereopsis are correlated with one another.

Methods : We estimated sensory eye dominance and stereoacuity with bandpass spatial frequency filtered targets (SFpeak 3 c/deg) at seven gaze directions (-18° to +18° horizontally and -12° to +12° vertically, relative to primary gaze) in 5 observers with strabismus (5 - 45 prism diopters) and 6 normally-sighted controls (ages 6- 53). Eye dominance at each location was estimated by measuring the interocular contrast ratio (ICR) of a pair of dichoptic bandpass optotypes that produced perceptual reports of each optotype with equal frequency (Kwon et al., 2015). Stereopsis thresholds were measured as the disparity at which subjects identified a front-depth bandpass ring target with 80% accuracy in a 4-alternative forced-choice task.

Results : Controls showed greater right-eye dominance for rightward gaze directions, consistent with previous findings. Based on linear fits to control observers’ ICRs at each location, the average change was +0.14% ± 0.05% contrast per degree of horizontal gaze change. Observers with strabismus showed greater variability in eye dominance (-2.83 %/deg to +0.25 %/deg), with some participants showing greater left-eye dominance for rightward gaze directions. In addition, gaze directions with greater sensory imbalance (i.e., more skewed ICRs) were not associated with poorer stereo performance across all observers (Pearson’s r = 0.11 p = 0.46).

Conclusions : In observers with strabismus, variation in sensory eye dominance at different horizontal gaze directions cannot be explained solely by changes in retinal image size. In addition, within observers, variations in stereopsis thresholds can be dissociated from variations in eye dominance at different gaze directions, indicating that these tasks measure different functional endpoints.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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