June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Reduced Blood Flow in the Choroidal Watershed and Parapapillary Hypoperfusion Zones and Relation to Optic Disc Blood Flow
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Zaidoon Y Alshare
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Ryuya Hashimoto
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Randy Kardon
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
    Ophthalmology, Iowa City Viteran Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Zaidoon Alshare, None; Ryuya Hashimoto, None; Randy Kardon, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Iowa City VA Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Visual Loss. Funded by the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development (RR&D) Division I50RX003002-01
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 1744. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Zaidoon Y Alshare, Ryuya Hashimoto, Randy Kardon; Reduced Blood Flow in the Choroidal Watershed and Parapapillary Hypoperfusion Zones and Relation to Optic Disc Blood Flow. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):1744.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The choroidal watershed and parapapillary hypoperfusion zones are regions of reduced blood flow that are also shared with the blood supply to the prelaminar optic nerve and may be vulnerable to decreases in perfusion pressure in NAION and glaucoma. We sought to establish the degree of reduced blood flow in these parapapillary choroidal regions and the corresponding sectors of the optic nerve head using laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG).

Methods : A case-control study of 48 patients with NAION and 28 control subjects were studied using LSFG. In a subset of eyes, fluorescein angiography was used to spatially correlate the location of the choroidal hypoperfusion zones with LSFG. Blood flow was compared between the areas within and outside of the choroidal hypoperfusion zone and its relation to blood flow in adjacent corresponding sectors of the optic nerve head.

Results : Blood flow within the choroidal hypoperfusion zone was reduced to 50.6 ± 16.5% (mean ± SD) of blood flow in the adjacent choroid, outside of the hypoperfusion zone. Besides a highly significant correlation between blood flow in sectors of the optic nerve rim tissue and adjacent peripapillary choroid, blood flow was significantly lower in rim sectors on the temporal side of the nerve compared to the nasal side (p=0.0001), especially when the parapapillary choroidal hypoperfusion zone was located more temporal to the center of the optic nerve.

Conclusions : Blood flow is significantly lower in the choroidal watershed and parapapillary hypoperfusion zones, making its vascular bed more vulnerable to dips in ocular perfusion pressure. The spatial location of the choroidal watershed and parapapillary hypoperfusion zone relative to the optic nerve head and its shared blood supply with the prelaminar optic nerve may impart additional risk to those nerve sectors lying within it in ischemic disorders of the optic nerve.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×