June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Novel function of ocular surface mast cells in promoting corneal angiogenesis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • WonKyung Cho
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sharad Mittal
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Elsayed Elbasiony
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sunil Chauhan
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   WonKyung Cho, None; Sharad Mittal, None; Elsayed Elbasiony, None; Sunil Chauhan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NEI-R01EY029727
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 2321. doi:
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      WonKyung Cho, Sharad Mittal, Elsayed Elbasiony, Sunil Chauhan; Novel function of ocular surface mast cells in promoting corneal angiogenesis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):2321.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Corneal neovascularization, induced by various ocular insults, compromises corneal transparency. The present study investigated the function of ocular surface mast cells in mediating corneal angiogenesis following ocular injury in a murine model of corneal angiogenesis.

Methods : Distribution of mast cells at the ocular surface was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of avidin stained corneas of balb/c mice. Neovascularization was induced by placing a single figure-8 intrastromal suture on the nasal side of the cornea using 11-0 nylon suture. Mast cell activation was evaluated by quantifying mast cell specific β-tryptase and β-hexosaminidase levels in the tear wash. Vessel growth was clinically evaluated using slit lamp. Corneas were harvested and stained for CD31+ (vascular endothelial cell marker) for IHC analysis of microvascular angiogenesis. Mice were locally treated with mast cell blocker (2% cromolyn in PBS) to study the effect of mast cell inhibition on angiogenesis.

Results : Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated abundance of mast cells in peripheral cornea and limbal area. Tear wash collected at 0, 3, 6 hours following intrastromal suture placement showed a significant 5-fold increase of tryptase (p<0.01) and a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase levels, relative to naive controls. Significant neovascularization towards the site of suture placement was observed by day 4 post-surgery (3.6 ± 0.4% vs. 16.2 ± 1.6%; p<0.01). Treatment of cromolyn, a mast cell inhibitor, abated angiogenesis as observed under the slit lamp (12.4 ± 2.3% vs. 5.6 ± 0.03%; p<0.05). This effect was further confirmed with CD31+ IHC analysis demonstrating a significantly smaller vascular area compared to PBS-treated control (1.5 ±0.2 mm2 vs. 0.5 ± 0.02 mm2; p<0.01).

Conclusions : Our data demonstrate that blockade of ocular surface mast cell activation inhibits neovascularization, suggesting mast cells contribute to corneal angiogenesis.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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