June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
The Relationship Between Vision-related Quality of Life and Seasonal Affective Disorder in Patients with Glaucoma and Macular Degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Miranda D Prosniewski
    Ophthalmology, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sidrah Anjum
    Ophthalmology, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
  • Amer Alwreikat
    Ophthalmology, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
    Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
  • Patrick R Aquino
    Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Medicine, Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
    Psychiatry Department, Tufts University School of Medicine, Burlington, Massachusetts, United States
  • David J Ramsey
    Ophthalmology, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
    Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Peabody, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Miranda Prosniewski, None; Sidrah Anjum, None; Amer Alwreikat, None; Patrick Aquino, None; David Ramsey, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  DJR & PRA: Robert E. Wise, M.D., Research and Education Institute, Lahey Hospital, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Burlington, MA. DJR: Supported by the Harry N. Lee Family Chair in Innovation, Lahey Medical Center, Beth Israel Lahey Health, Peabody, Massachusetts.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 2672. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Miranda D Prosniewski, Sidrah Anjum, Amer Alwreikat, Patrick R Aquino, David J Ramsey; The Relationship Between Vision-related Quality of Life and Seasonal Affective Disorder in Patients with Glaucoma and Macular Degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):2672.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To study the extent to which patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and/or primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) have seasonal affective disorder (SAD) symptoms and to correlate the reported difficulties with severity of visual symptoms and/or visual impairment.

Methods : Cross-sectional, comparative case series of patients with intermediate to advanced AMD and/or moderate to advanced POAG identified through billing records. Each prospective participant was mailed a letter of invitation to participate in the study and asked to complete a copy of the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-39) and Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). A multiple regression analysis was performed to create a predictive model for SAD based on the Global Seasonality Score (GSS) using the visual function questions on the VFQ-39, as well as clinical characteristics abstracted from the medical record for each participant.

Results : 103 subjects out of 350 recruited returned questionnaires (31%). The return rate was greater for subjects with AMD (36%) compared to POAG (26%) (p=0.027), this despite the former group having worse visual acuity (p<0.001). Subjects who reported symptoms of SAD (GSS >8) tended to be older (84.9±5.9 years vs. 79.4±9.5 years, p = 0.008) and had lower vision-related quality of life (VFQ-39 composite score 59.0 vs 73.6, p<0.001). Linear regression analysis failed to find an association between SAD symptoms and gender, diagnosis (AMD vs POAG), or low vision status. Exploratory factor analysis using a Principal Components Analysis showed that the items on the VFQ-39 split into two distinct dimensions that explained 59.7% of the total variance: mainly vision-related problems and those that involved quality of life. Stepwise regression was performed to assess the ability of items in the VFQ-39 to predict the presence of SAD symptoms (R2=0.887, p<0.001). Hierarchical regression modeling found that the best inclusive model for SAD included only VFA9, VFA7 and VF11 (R2=0.2227, p<0.001).

Conclusions : Vision-related quality of life is a better predictor of symptoms related to SAD than low vision. Interestingly, the social functioning sub-scale was the best predictor of symptoms related to SAD, and not the mental health subscale, perhaps because the former focuses more on anxiety than depression about vision.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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