June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Differing Optic Nerve Head Strains Comparing Low, High and Pathologic Myopia Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Quan V Hoang
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Thanadet Chuangsuwanich
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Daryle Jason Go Yu
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Tin A Tun
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Chee Wai Wong
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Xiaofei Wang
    School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, China
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Zhi Yun Chin
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Sripad Krishna Devalla
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Dan Milea
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Tin Aung
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Michael J A Girard
    Ophthalmic Engineering & Innovation Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    SIngapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Quan Hoang, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care (F); Thanadet Chuangsuwanich, None; Daryle Jason Yu, None; Tin Tun, None; Chee Wai Wong, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care (F); Xiaofei Wang, None; Zhi Yun Chin, None; Sripad Krishna Devalla, None; Dan Milea, None; Tin Aung, None; Michael Girard, Abyss Processing Pte Ltd (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY023595 (QVH), Singapore National Medical Research Council (NMRC) Grant CSSSP (QVH), NMRC CSA-Inv Grant (MOH-000151, QVH), Duke-NUS Khoo Grant KBrFA 2018 (QVH), Singapore Ministry of Education, Academic Research Funds Tier 2 (R-397-000-280-112 & R-397-000-308-112 (MG))
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 2679. doi:
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      Quan V Hoang, Thanadet Chuangsuwanich, Daryle Jason Go Yu, Tin A Tun, Chee Wai Wong, Xiaofei Wang, Zhi Yun Chin, Sripad Krishna Devalla, Dan Milea, Tin Aung, Michael J A Girard; Differing Optic Nerve Head Strains Comparing Low, High and Pathologic Myopia Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):2679.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess optic nerve head (ONH) strains (i.e. deformations) following adduction, abduction, and IOP elevation in healthy and highly myopic eyes (with and without pathologies).

Methods : We recruited 18 subjects, which comprised of 6 emmetropic or low myopia (LM), 6 highly myopia (HM: > 26 mm in axial length) and 6 pathologic myopia (PM = HM + staphyloma and/or macular degeneration). For each subject, we imaged the ONH using Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) under the following conditions: (1) primary gaze, (2) 20o adduction, (3) 20o abduction, and (4) primary gaze with acute IOP elevation (to ~40 mmHg) achieved through ophthalmodynamometry. For each OCT volume, we automatically segmented the prelaminar tissue (PLT) and the lamina cribrosa (LC) using deep learning. We also digitally aligned the OCT volumes obtained from (2)-(4) to the baseline volume (1) before performing digital volume correlation (DVC) analysis to quantify IOP- and gaze-induced PLT and LC displacements for all scenarios. The resulting displacement fields obtained from the DVC analysis were then used to calculate the effective strain (a local measure of tissue deformation) that was compared across groups.

Results : IOP elevation generated abnormally high strains (6.6 ± 1.9%) in PM eyes as compared to HM eyes (3.4 ± 1.0%) and LM eyes (2.6 ± 0.8%). The same trend was also observed for eye movements. Interestingly, PM eyes experienced similar strains (no significance difference, p > 0.05) under IOP elevation (6.6 ± 1.9%) and adduction (6.4 ± 2.1%). In one subject with high axial anisometropia, the average strain in the PLT of the PM right eye (7.4 ± 2.3%) was much higher than that the LM left eye (4.3 ± 1.5%) under IOP elevation (p < 0.05).

Conclusions : We found that HM eyes tend to be more sensitive to IOP elevation as compared to LM eyes. PM eyes experienced abnormally high strains and they were equally influenced by IOP elevation and adduction. These preliminary results may indicate that ONH strain differs significantly between LM, HM and PM eyes and has the potential to serve as a biomarker for progression.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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