June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Visual snow patients show functional hyperconnectivity and structural abnormalities of brain regions involved in visual processing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ghislaine L Traber
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland
    Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB), Basel, Switzerland
  • Njoud Aldusary
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Patrick Freund
    Spinal Cord Injury Center Balgrist, University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • Fabienne C. Fierz
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • Konrad P Weber
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • Marco Piccirelli
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Arvwa Baeshen
    Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Jamaan Alghamdi
    Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Bujar Saliju
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • Shila Pazahr
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • R Mazloum
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Fahad Alshehri
    Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia
  • Klara Landau
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland
  • Spyros Kollias
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Lars Michels
    Dept of Neuroradiology, Clinical Neuroscience Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ghislaine Traber, None; Njoud Aldusary, None; Patrick Freund, None; Fabienne Fierz, None; Konrad Weber, None; Marco Piccirelli, None; Arvwa Baeshen, None; Jamaan Alghamdi, None; Bujar Saliju, None; Shila Pazahr, None; R Mazloum, None; Fahad Alshehri, None; Klara Landau, None; Spyros Kollias, None; Lars Michels, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 3387. doi:
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      Ghislaine L Traber, Njoud Aldusary, Patrick Freund, Fabienne C. Fierz, Konrad P Weber, Marco Piccirelli, Arvwa Baeshen, Jamaan Alghamdi, Bujar Saliju, Shila Pazahr, R Mazloum, Fahad Alshehri, Klara Landau, Spyros Kollias, Lars Michels; Visual snow patients show functional hyperconnectivity and structural abnormalities of brain regions involved in visual processing. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):3387.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Visual snow (VS) is a distressing, life-impacting condition with persistent visual phenomena. Visual snow patients show cerebral hypermetabolism within the visual cortex, resulting in altered neuronal excitability. We hypothesize to see disease-dependent change in functional connectivity and grey matter in regions associated with visual perception.

Methods : We studied 19 patients with VS and 16 age-matched healthy controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was applied to examine resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC). Volume changes were assessed by means of voxel-based morphometry. Finally, we assessed associations between MRI and clinical parameters.

Results : Patients with VS showed significant hyperconnectivity between visual and inferior temporal brain regions, and also between prefrontal, parietal, and cerebellar brain regions (corrected for age and migraine occurrence). In addition, patients showed increased grey matter volume in the lingual gyrus (all p<0.05 corrected). Symptom duration positively correlated to grey matter volume of the bilateral lingual gyrus (p<0.05 corrected).

Conclusions : Our data suggests that VS is associated with abnormal excitability of brain regions involved in visual processing. We conclude that both functional and structural plasticity contributes to evolving impairments in VS patients. These in-vivo neuroimaging biomarkers hold potential to predict individual outcomes and to track the effects of therapeutic intervention.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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