June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Conjunctival Sac Microbiome in Bacterial Conjunctivitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yasser Helmy Mohamed
    Ophthalmology, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, NAGASAKI, Japan
  • Masafumi Uematsu
    Ophthalmology, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, NAGASAKI, Japan
  • Yoshitomo Morinaga
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Michiko Toizumi
    Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Takashi Kitaoka
    Ophthalmology, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, NAGASAKI, Japan
  • Lay-Myint Yoshida
    Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yasser Mohamed, None; Masafumi Uematsu, None; Yoshitomo Morinaga, None; Michiko Toizumi, None; Takashi Kitaoka, None; Lay-Myint Yoshida, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 4908. doi:
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      Yasser Helmy Mohamed, Masafumi Uematsu, Yoshitomo Morinaga, Michiko Toizumi, Takashi Kitaoka, Lay-Myint Yoshida; Conjunctival Sac Microbiome in Bacterial Conjunctivitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):4908.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose :
To use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing method to identify the bacterial community in conjunctival sacs of eyes with infectious conjunctivitis.

Methods :
The study conducted as an observational study at the outpatient clinic of Khanh Hoa General Hospital in Nha Trang, Vietnam. Clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis cases from September 2016 through December 2017 were included for bacterial community identification. Conjunctival swabs specimens were obtained carefully from the severely infected patient’s eye. The samples were used for pathogens detection using conventional culture and PCR examinations.

Results :
The study included randomly selected 47 patients. More than 98% of all DNA reads represented five bacterial phyla. Three of these phyla constitute 92% of all sequences [Firmicutes (35%), Actinobacteria (31%), and Proteobacteria (26%)]. At the genus level, there were twelve common genera constituted about 61% of all the sequence reads. Seven of those genera were common [Streptococcus (10%), Cutibacterium (10%), Staphylococcus (7%), Nocardioides (7%), Corynebacterium 1 (5%), Anoxybacillus (5%), and Acinetobacter (5%)], which encompassed 49% of all reads. As for diversity analysis, there was no difference in PERMANOVA analysis (Unweighted UniFrac) for sex (P=0.087), for cases with chemosis and without chemosis (P=0.064) and between the cases as regarding use of unclassified eyedrops (P=0.431). Also, there was no difference in PERMANOVA analysis (Unweighted UniFrac) for cases with pain (P=0.315) and cases with itching (P=0.133). There was a statistical significant difference in cases with bilateral versus unilateral conjunctivitis (P=0.017) and for cases using antibiotics (P=0.020).

Conclusions :
Molecular analysis revealed a diverse conjunctival bacterial population in bacterial conjunctivitis. Continued investigations of ocular microbial communities are required to add valuable information for the prevention and treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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