June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Gender Differences in Scholarship Productivity and Academic Promotion of United States Academic Cornea Specialists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mckenzee Chiam
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Mona Camacci
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Erik Lehman
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Michael Chen
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Gargi Vora
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Seth Pantanelli
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Mckenzee Chiam, None; Mona Camacci, None; Erik Lehman, None; Michael Chen, None; Gargi Vora, None; Seth Pantanelli, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NCATS Grant Number UL1 TR000127 and UL1 TR002014
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 5227. doi:
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      Mckenzee Chiam, Mona Camacci, Erik Lehman, Michael Chen, Gargi Vora, Seth Pantanelli; Gender Differences in Scholarship Productivity and Academic Promotion of United States Academic Cornea Specialists. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):5227.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Cornea specialists represent the second largest subspecialty among academic ophthalmologists. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the gender differences among academic cornea specialists with regard to scholarly productivity and academic promotion.

Methods : This study was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic cornea specialists listed on the institutional websites of all 113 allopathic US ophthalmology programs between January and March 2019. Using official institutional websites, data on gender and academic rank were obtained. Faculty members’ h-index, a published author’s scholarly productivity and citation impact, and m-quotient, a measure of scholarly productivity adjusted for career length, were obtained using the Scopus database. The study used chi-square tests to analyze categorical values and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests to analyze continuous variables.

Results : A total of 440 academic cornea specialists were identified, including 131 (29.8%) women and 309 (70.2%) men. A higher proportion of women compared to men were assistant professors [91 (69.5%) vs. 129 (41.7%); p<0.001] and a smaller proportion of women were full professors [17 (13.0%) vs. 115 (37.2%); p<0.001]. No significance difference was found among associate professor positions [female: 23 (17.6%) vs. male: 65 (21.0%); p=1.00] and department chair positions [5 (3.82%) vs. 29 (9.39%); p = 0.55]. Women had significantly lower median h-indices compared to their male counterpart (4.0 vs. 11.0; p<0.001), but similar median m-quotients (0.5 vs 0.5; p=1.00). Women also had a lower mean career length based on their residency graduation year compared to men (14.2 years vs 24.2 years; p <0.001).

Conclusions : Female academic cornea specialists face a disparity in academic promotion as shown by the underrepresentation in senior academic ranks. Among cornea specialists, males had higher h-indices than females; however, no differences were seen in m-quotients. The data suggest that both the increased scholarly productivity and advanced academic rank associated with male gender is related to longer academic career length.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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