June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Optical coherence tomography artifacts predict adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy success in achromatopsia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katie M Litts
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Erica N. Woertz
    Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Rachel E Linderman
    Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Byron L Lam
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Gerald A Fishman
    Pangere Center for Inherited Retinal Diseases, The Chicago Lighthouse, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Mark E Pennesi
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States
  • Christine N Kay
    Vitreoretinal Associates, Gainesville, Florida, United States
  • William W Hauswirth
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States
  • Joseph Carroll
    Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
    Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Katie Litts, None; Erica Woertz, None; Rachel Linderman, OptoVue (C); Byron Lam, AGTC (F); Gerald Fishman, AGTC (F); Mark Pennesi, AGTC (F); Christine Kay, AGTC (F); William Hauswirth, AGTC (I), AGTC (R), AGTC (C); Joseph Carroll, AGTC (F), MeiraGTx (C), MeiraGTx (F), OptoVue (F), Translational Imaging Innovations (I)
  • Footnotes
    Support  R01EY017607, F32EY029148, T32GM080202, UL1TR001436, TL1TR001437, R24EY022023, P30EY010572, Unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness to Casey Eye Institute
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 5271. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Katie M Litts, Erica N. Woertz, Rachel E Linderman, Byron L Lam, Gerald A Fishman, Mark E Pennesi, Christine N Kay, William W Hauswirth, Joseph Carroll; Optical coherence tomography artifacts predict adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy success in achromatopsia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):5271.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The relatively low success of acquiring adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) images from subjects with achromatopsia (ACHM) has largely been attributed to the presence of nystagmus in these patients.1 The ability to predict which patients will yield successful AOSLO images would be valuable for clinical trials by reducing costs and decreasing patient burden. Here we examined whether artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images could be used to predict the success or failure of AOSLO imaging in subjects with ACHM.

Methods : One eye from 66 subjects with genetically-confirmed ACHM (15 CNGA3 and 51 CNGB3; 30 females and 36 males) was imaged with OCT (Cirrus, 512x128 macular cube) and non-confocal split detection AOSLO. OCT artifacts in the reconstructed vertical volume from the macular cube were graded into 1 of 4 categories: 1) none or minimal, 2) clear and low frequency, 3) low amplitude and high frequency, and 4) high amplitude and high frequency. Each vertical volume was graded once by two observers. A third observer graded any discrepancies and reviewed any additional volumes when needed to reach a consensus, which was used for subsequent analyses. AOSLO success was defined as sufficient image quality in split detector images at the fovea to assess cone quantity.

Results : There was near perfect agreement between the two observers for assessing the OCT artifact grade (kappa = 0.86). AOSLO was successful in 31/66 (47%) subjects. For subjects with grade 1 OCT artifacts, AOSLO success was 65% (22/34 subjects); grade 2 was 47% (8/17 subjects); grade 3 was 11% (1/9 subjects); and grade 4 was 0% (0/6 subjects). There was a significant association between OCT artifact grade and AOSLO success (p = 0.0002, Chi-squared test).

Conclusions : Subjects with less severe OCT artifacts are most likely to be good candidates for AOSLO imaging. As these OCT artifacts are typically due to the presence of nystagmus, more direct measures of nystagmus (e.g., pupil tracking) may show higher predictive power. Nonetheless, our results may be useful in guiding patient selection for AOSLO imaging in clinical trials for ACHM.

1PMID: 27479814

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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