June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Evaluating Skin Pigmentation as a Risk Factor for Glaucoma.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amer Alsoudi
    School of Medicine, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Abeba Giorgis
    Ophthalmology, King Menelik II, Ethiopia
  • Abiye Mulugeta
    Ophthalmology, King Menelik II, Ethiopia
  • Tadesse Tesfaye
    Ophthalmology, King Menelik II, Ethiopia
  • Mhretab Zeru
    Ophthalmology, King Menelik II, Ethiopia
  • Jeremy Keenan
    Ophthalmology, Proctor Foundation, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
    School of Medicine, UCSF, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Amer Alsoudi, None; Abeba Giorgis, None; Abiye Mulugeta, None; Tadesse Tesfaye, None; Mhretab Zeru, None; Jeremy Keenan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Fortisure Gift Fun, Resource Allocation Program for Trainees, Research to Prevent Blindness, That Man May See
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 42. doi:
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      Amer Alsoudi, Abeba Giorgis, Abiye Mulugeta, Tadesse Tesfaye, Mhretab Zeru, Jeremy Keenan; Evaluating Skin Pigmentation as a Risk Factor for Glaucoma.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):42.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The African Caribbean Eye Survey and Barbados Eye Study both implicated darker skin pigmentation as a risk factor for glaucoma. Skin color was based on subjective observation by two ophthalmologists. Whether this association would be present using a more objective measure of skin pigmentation is unclear. Investigating this question was the purpose this study.

Methods : A case-control study was conducted at Menelik II Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Cases were enrolled from a glaucoma clinic among patients scheduled for trabeculectomy and age-matched controls without glaucoma were drawn from other clinics at Menelik Hospital. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken in triplicate with a Dermacatch device on the forehead (i.e., sun-exposed) and inner arm (i.e., sun-unexposed).

Results : Agreement between the triplicate measurements was high; the intra-class correlation (ICC) for triplicate inner arm melanin values was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99). The intra-class correlation (ICC) for triplicate forehead melanin values was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.93-0.96). Agreement between inner arm and forehead measurements for the same person was moderate; the ICC for melanin measurements between the two locations was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.48-0.66). Further, the ICC for triplicate forehead and inner arm erythema values were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.48-0.63) and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.64-0.75), respectively. Agreement between inner arm and forehead measurements for the same person was moderate; the ICC for erythema measurements between the two locations was 0.44 (95% CI, 0.33-0.55). After adjusting for sex and date of measurement, the odds of glaucoma was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.70-1.59) odds higher per 100 units of inner arm melanin, and 1.16 (95% CI, 0.66-2.06) odds higher per 100 units of forehead melanin (P=0.54 and P=0.04, respectively).

Conclusions : This study failed to find a significant association between skin pigmentation and glaucoma using an objective and reproducible assessment of pigmentation.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Figure 1. Melanin estimate of the inner arm and forehead among cases and controls

Figure 1. Melanin estimate of the inner arm and forehead among cases and controls

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