June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasms in 75 HIV+ Mozambicans
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ye Ji Kim
    Department of Ophthalmology, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, San Diego, California, United States
  • Chau Miu
    Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Carla Carrilho
    Department of Pathology, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique
  • Yu-Tsueng Liu
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Robert Schooley
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Jonathan H Lin
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
    Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ye Ji Kim, None; Chau Miu, None; Carla Carrilho, None; Yu-Tsueng Liu, None; Robert Schooley, Antiva Bioscience (I), CytoDyn (C), Gilead Sciences (C), VIR (C); Jonathan Lin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NCI P30 CA23100, NIAID P30 AI36214, P30EY022589
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 4661. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Ye Ji Kim, Chau Miu, Carla Carrilho, Yu-Tsueng Liu, Robert Schooley, Jonathan H Lin; Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasms in 75 HIV+ Mozambicans. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):4661.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) arises from malignant transformation of the keratinocytes within the squamous epithelia of the conjunctiva and cornea, the anterior ocular surface tissues. OSSN is more common in HIV infected populations. HIV infection also significantly increases the risk for developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related carcinomas. HPV, especially the high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, causes squamous cell dysplasia and carcinoma arising from cervix, head, and neck squamous epithelia. However, HPV in OSSN among HIV infected patients is unclear. Here, we use p16 positive immunohistochemical reactivity, a widely used biomarker to identify HPV in cervical, head and neck squamous neoplasms, on OSSN surgical excisions collected from a large HIV infected cohort from Mozambique to determine if p16 was induced in these squamous neoplasms.

Methods : OSSN surgical tissue specimens were collected from 75 Mozambican patients. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from these OSSNs were sectioned, stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), and p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. H&E slides were reviewed to determine if OSSNs were noninvasive conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasms (CIN) or invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Cases were classified as p16 positive or negative based on diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of p16 in neoplastic cells.

Results : p16 positivity was found in a minority of OSSN cases (14/75). p16 positivity was significantly associated with the invasive SCC type of OSSN in HIV-infected patients (p-value of 0.026).

Conclusions : The majority of OSSNs in our HIV infected cohort did not express p16. However, those cases that were p16-positive were significantly more likely to be the invasive SCC form of OSSN. We propose that p16 expression may identify more aggressive OSSNs in HIV-infected populations.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Clinical photographs of two different patients with Ocular Surface Squamous lesions prior to surgical excision.

Clinical photographs of two different patients with Ocular Surface Squamous lesions prior to surgical excision.

 

Ocular Surface Squamous lesions with p16 immunohistochemistry staining. A) Normal conjunctiva (H&E stain). B) CIN with abnormal cancer cells (*) within epithelium not penetrating basement membrane (black arrow) (H&E stain). C) Invasive SCC with abnormal cancer cells (*) infiltrating lamina propria (H&E stain). D) p16-negative OSSN and E) diffuse p16-positive OSSN (brown staining) compared to F) diffuse p16-positive Cervical SCC staining used as a control.

Ocular Surface Squamous lesions with p16 immunohistochemistry staining. A) Normal conjunctiva (H&E stain). B) CIN with abnormal cancer cells (*) within epithelium not penetrating basement membrane (black arrow) (H&E stain). C) Invasive SCC with abnormal cancer cells (*) infiltrating lamina propria (H&E stain). D) p16-negative OSSN and E) diffuse p16-positive OSSN (brown staining) compared to F) diffuse p16-positive Cervical SCC staining used as a control.

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