June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Laterality of Amblyopia in the United States: A Preliminary Analysis from the 2017 IRIS Registry
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dian Li
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Data Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Eun Young Choi
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • Mengyu Wang
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Yangjiani Li
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    State key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  • Nathan Eli Hall
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Hui Wang
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Institute for Psychology and Behavior, Jilin University of Finance and Economics, Changchun, Jilin, China
  • Qingying Jin
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Department of Psychology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China
  • Raymond C S Wong
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Lucia Sobrin
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Joan W Miller
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Alice Lorch
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Tobias Elze
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Dian Li, None; Eun Young Choi, None; Mengyu Wang, None; Yangjiani Li, None; Nathan Hall, None; Hui Wang, None; Qingying Jin, None; Raymond C S Wong, None; Lucia Sobrin, None; Joan Miller, Genentech/Roche (C), Genentech/Roche (R), KalVista Pharmaceuticals (C), Lowy Medical Research Institute (F), ONL Therapeutics (C), ONL Therapeutics (P), ONL Therapeutics (I), ONL Therapeutics (R), Sunovion (C), Valeant Pharmaceuticals/Mass. Eye and Ear (P), Valeant Pharmaceuticals/Mass. Eye and Ear (R); Alice Lorch, None; Tobias Elze, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R21 EY030142; R21 EY030631; R01 EY030575; NIH K99 EY028631; NEI Core Grant P30 EY003790; Lions Foundation; Grimshaw-Gudewicz Foundation; Research to Prevent Blindness; BrightFocus Foundation; Alice Adler Fellowship;
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 5420. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Dian Li, Eun Young Choi, Mengyu Wang, Yangjiani Li, Nathan Eli Hall, Hui Wang, Qingying Jin, Raymond C S Wong, Lucia Sobrin, Joan W Miller, Alice Lorch, Tobias Elze; Laterality of Amblyopia in the United States: A Preliminary Analysis from the 2017 IRIS Registry. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):5420.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Laterality differences in amblyopia have been observed in several studies, though typically with small sample sizes. Here, we utilized a large population dataset to determine the prevalence of amblyopia in the left versus right eye in the United States.

Methods : Electronic medical records of patients diagnosed with amblyopia in at least one eye were extracted from the 2017 Intelligent Research in Sight (IRIS) Registry database curated by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Categories of amblyopia were defined by the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) code. Four types of amblyopia were documented: unspecified amblyopia (ICD-10 code H53.00), deprivation amblyopia (H53.01), refractive amblyopia (H53.02), and strabismic amblyopia (H53.03). For each type of amblyopia, the prevalence of unilateral or bilateral disease was calculated. Subsequently, among those with unilateral amblyopia, the prevalence of disease in the left or right eye was analyzed. The binomial test was used to assess statistical significance.

Results : A total of 112,800 patients with amblyopia were extracted from the 2017 IRIS Registry. Of these patients, 51,484, 3,421, 37,918, and 19,977 had unspecified, deprivation, refractive, and strabismic amblyopia, respectively. The mean and standard deviations (SD) of age and gender ratios can be found in Table 1. All four types of amblyopia occurred significantly more commonly in one eye than in both eyes (all P values < 0.001), with strabismic amblyopia having the highest ratio of unilateral diagnosis (89.5%; Figure 1A). Among those with unilateral amblyopia, the left eye was consistently more affected across all types of amblyopia (Figure 1B). Specifically, the left eye accounted for 55.4% (unspecified), 54.2% (deprivation), 55.2% (refractive), and 55.1% (strabismic) of unilateral amblyopia, respectively (all P values < 0.001).

Conclusions : For all four types of amblyopia defined by the ICD-10 code, unilateral amblyopia was significantly more prevalent than bilateral amblyopia. In patients with unilateral amblyopia, the prevalence was approximately 10% higher in the left eye than the right eye. These results are consistent with trends reported in the previous literature, confirming the findings using the much larger IRIS Registry.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

 

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