June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
The Blepharoplasty Teacher: Origami Model for Learning Eyelid Anatomy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Henick
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States
  • Ilana Margulies
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States
  • Farah Sayegh
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States
  • Peter Taub
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Daniel Henick, None; Ilana Margulies, None; Farah Sayegh, None; Peter Taub, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 3958. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Daniel Henick, Ilana Margulies, Farah Sayegh, Peter Taub; The Blepharoplasty Teacher: Origami Model for Learning Eyelid Anatomy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):3958.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The ability to master the anatomy of complex structures foundational to certain operations remains a challenging pursuit for students and trainees. Therefore, the authors developed a low-tech and low-cost teaching model that creatively uses the principles of origami, the art of paper folding, to promote educational engagement and understanding of the eyelid anatomy critical for performing blepharoplasty. A randomized-control trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy of the developed origami model, The Blepharoplasty Teacher, in improving education and knowledge retention.

Methods : Twenty-one first and second year medical students at the Icahn School of Medicine were recruited. Participants were administered a ten-question pre-test about eyelid anatomy to evaluate baseline knowledge and were then surveyed regarding comfort level with this anatomy. Participants were randomized to receive The Blepharoplasty Teacher (n=11) or textbook pages covering the same anatomy (n=10) and were given 30 minutes to study their designated resource. They were then administered a different ten-question post-test about eyelid anatomy, and their comfort level was re-assessed. Students who used The Blepharoplasty Teacher were also asked how likely they were to recommend it to a colleague. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square and paired t-tests.

Results : Students who used The Blepharoplasty Teacher significantly improved their test scores by an average of 1.4 points (SD=1.7, p=0.017) while students using the textbook did not achieve significant improvement (average=0.1 points, SD=1.8, p>0.05) (Figure 1). 73% of students using The Blepharoplasty Teacher improved their score by at least 1 point, as compared to 30% in the textbook group (p=0.05). 55% of students who used The Blepharoplasty Teacher felt more comfortable with eyelid anatomy after the study, as compared to 10% of students using the textbook (p=0.031). 82% of students would recommend The Blepharoplasty Teacher to a colleague.

Conclusions : An innovative and low-tech approach to teaching the eyelid anatomy relevant to the operative approach in blepharoplasty can effectively facilitate student learning. Similar models should be created for teaching the anatomy of other complex structures.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Figure 1. Comparison of students’ pre-test and post-test scores using The Blepharoplasty Teacher or textbook

Figure 1. Comparison of students’ pre-test and post-test scores using The Blepharoplasty Teacher or textbook

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