June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
In vivo imaging of corneal nerves and cellular structures in mice with Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cristina Canavesi
    LighTopTech Corp., W Henrietta, New York, United States
  • Andrea Cogliati
    LighTopTech Corp., W Henrietta, New York, United States
  • Amanda Mietus
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States
  • Yue Qi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States
  • Jesse B Schallek
    Ophthalmology, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York, United States
    Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, New York, United States
  • Jannick Rolland-Thompson
    LighTopTech Corp., W Henrietta, New York, United States
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States
  • Holly B Hindman
    The Eye Care Center, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Cristina Canavesi, LighTopTech Corp. (I); Andrea Cogliati, LighTopTech Corp. (I); Amanda Mietus, None; Yue Qi, None; Jesse Schallek, Hoffman-LaRoche (F), University of Rochester (P); Jannick Rolland-Thompson, LighTopTech Corp. (I), University of Rochester (P); Holly Hindman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant 1R43EY028827-01; NSF Grant IIP-1534701; Jesse Schallek ALL Funding: Research supported by National Eye Institute Award No. NEI R01 EY028293, P30 EY001319 and R43 EY028827. Research grant from Hoffman-LaRoche (Roche pRED), an Unrestricted Grant to the University of Rochester, Department of Ophthalmology and a Career Development Award (Schallek) from Research to Prevent Blindness, New York and the Dana Foundation David Mahoney Neuroimaging Award (Schallek).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 4736. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Cristina Canavesi, Andrea Cogliati, Amanda Mietus, Yue Qi, Jesse B Schallek, Jannick Rolland-Thompson, Holly B Hindman; In vivo imaging of corneal nerves and cellular structures in mice with Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):4736.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : We investigate the feasibility of non-contact imaging of mice corneas with Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy (GDOCM) to resolve endothelial cells and corneal nerves in vivo.

Methods : In vivo GDOCM imaging was conducted on six healthy and six hyperglycemic C57BL/6J mice. Hyperglycemic mice were induced with a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin at 150 mg/kg or rendered hyperglycemic by nature of misfolded insulin (Ins2akita/J mouse). Three-dimensional (3D) images of mice corneas over a field of view of 1 mm2 were collected in contact and non-contact configurations. An intensity-based registration using rigid body transformations was used to perform motion correction via the StackReg plug-in for ImageJ. Cellular resolution was achieved in the 3D images. Corneal nerve fibers were traced and their lengths and branches calculated using the Simple Neurite Tracer plug-in in ImageJ.

Results : In vivo corneal imaging with cellular resolution and differentiation over a field of view of 1 x 1 x 0.2 mm2 was demonstrated. Motion correction removed biological movement attributed to heart and respiration rate to allow recovery of cellular features in both contact and non-contact imaging modalities. Endothelial and epithelial cells showed mosaic patterns in both healthy and diabetic animals. Corneal nerves showed reductions in average nerve fiber length and in nerve branching points in diabetic mice consistent with ex vivo reports.

Conclusions : In vivo corneal imaging was conducted for the first time with GDOCM on normal and diabetic mice, with both non-contact and contact imaging modalities. The non-contact approach provides a volumetric field that enables quantification of key cellular features of the healthy and diabetic eye. This label-free approach may provide additional information in the clinical setting regarding the changes within disease populations or same eyes over time.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

a) 3D rendering of a mouse cornea imaged in vivo with GDOCM over a field of view of 1 mm2. En face view of basal epithelial cells (b) and endothelial cells (c). Bar is 0.1 mm. Sub-cellular structures thought to be primary cilia are visible (dark spots in the endothelial cells).

a) 3D rendering of a mouse cornea imaged in vivo with GDOCM over a field of view of 1 mm2. En face view of basal epithelial cells (b) and endothelial cells (c). Bar is 0.1 mm. Sub-cellular structures thought to be primary cilia are visible (dark spots in the endothelial cells).

 

Mouse corneas imaged in vivo with GDOCM. 1 mm2en face views using non-contact (a) and contact (b) imaging, averaged over a depth of 6-13 mm, with corneal nerves (arrows) visible after motion correction. The bar is 0.1 mm.

Mouse corneas imaged in vivo with GDOCM. 1 mm2en face views using non-contact (a) and contact (b) imaging, averaged over a depth of 6-13 mm, with corneal nerves (arrows) visible after motion correction. The bar is 0.1 mm.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×