June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Evaluation of physician perspectives of artificial intelligence in ophthalmology: a pilot study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tala Al-Khaled
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Nita Valikodath
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Emily Cole
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Joelle Hallak
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • J. Peter Campbell
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States
  • Michael F. Chiang
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States
  • Robison Vernon Paul Chan
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Tala Al-Khaled, None; Nita Valikodath, None; Emily Cole, None; Joelle Hallak, None; J. Peter Campbell, Genentech (F); Michael Chiang, Genentech (F), Inteleretina (I), Novartis (C); Robison Chan, Alcon (C), Novartis (C), Phoenix Technology (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Support by grants P30EY10572, P30EY001792, and R01EY029673 from the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD), by grants SCH-1622679, SCH-1622542, and SCH-1622536 from the National Science Foundation (Arlington, VA), and unrestricted departmental funding from Research to Prevent Blindness (New York, NY).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 2023. doi:
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      Tala Al-Khaled, Nita Valikodath, Emily Cole, Joelle Hallak, J. Peter Campbell, Michael F. Chiang, Robison Vernon Paul Chan; Evaluation of physician perspectives of artificial intelligence in ophthalmology: a pilot study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):2023.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In the field of ophthalmology, artificial intelligence (AI) has demonstrated high diagnostic performance and has the potential to be incorporated into clinical practice to facilitate management of ocular disease. Important factors to consider include effect on standard of care, the patient-physician relationship, and medicolegal liability. In an observational study, ophthalmologists were surveyed to identify their perceptions of AI.

Methods : Members of regional and national ophthalmologic societies in the United States were recruited via email. A web-based survey was administered and consisted of 15 items. Questions included topics such as understanding of AI, clinical concerns of AI, and willingness to incorporate AI in clinical practice and medical education. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted on the data collected.

Results : 170 ophthalmologists from a range of subspecialties completed the survey. 57% (97/170) of the participants were in pediatric ophthalmology. The participants were 62% (105/170) male. The mean graduation year from ophthalmology residency was 1997, and the range was 1970-2019 (n=170). Overall, 89% (151/170) reported that they either “agree” or “strongly agree” with understanding the concept of AI. Of the participants, 22% (37/170) were concerned that patient-physician rapport would be impacted by AI, and 64% (109/170) disagreed or strongly disagreed that AI will replace physicians. Moreover, 75% (127/170) reported believing that AI will improve the practice of ophthalmology, 74% (125/170) reported interest in integrating AI into their clinical practice, and 75% (127/170) indicated that there should be formal instruction in AI during medical school and residency training (Figure 1). 45% (77/170) reported concern over the diagnostic accuracy of AI.

Conclusions : The majority of the ophthalmologists in this survey had a positive outlook towards AI in ophthalmology. Further studies are warranted to explore the extent of physicians’ knowledge in AI and how best to incorporate AI into clinical practice.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Figure 1. Ophthalmologists’ Perspectives on AI. Ophthalmologists indicated the extent they agreed or disagreed with statements on the potential role of AI in ophthalmology.

Figure 1. Ophthalmologists’ Perspectives on AI. Ophthalmologists indicated the extent they agreed or disagreed with statements on the potential role of AI in ophthalmology.

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