June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
A joint motion and stereo constraint
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yiya Chen
    Wenzhou Medical University, China
  • Zhimo Yao
    Wenzhou Medical University, China
  • Pi-Chun Huang
    National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
  • Seung Hyun Min
    Mcgill University, Quebec, Canada
  • Robert F. Hess
    Mcgill University, Quebec, Canada
  • Jiawei Zhou
    Wenzhou Medical University, China
  • Fan Lu
    Wenzhou Medical University, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yiya Chen, None; Zhimo Yao, None; Pi-Chun Huang, None; Seung Hyun Min, None; Robert Hess, None; Jiawei Zhou, None; Fan Lu, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 5076. doi:
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      Yiya Chen, Zhimo Yao, Pi-Chun Huang, Seung Hyun Min, Robert F. Hess, Jiawei Zhou, Fan Lu; A joint motion and stereo constraint. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):5076.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In clinical practice, stereo acuity is assessed only using stationary stimuli. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel test to examine the effect of lateral motion on stereoscopic vision.

Methods : In particular, 50 Gabors with randomized position were presented in a circular display window in each eye; half of them were moving coherently to the left or the right and were assigned a disparity relative to fixation plane corresponding to the plane of the screen, while the other half of the elements were moving in the opposite direction and were assigned an equal and opposite disparity. Observers were instructed to detect whether the Gabors in the front plane moved to left or right. A staircase method was used to determine the stereo acuity. Sub-pixel stereo accuracy was achieved by recomputing rather than simply shifting element position.

Results : For the range of motion speed that we measured (from 0.17 to 5.33 degree/second), we show clear speed tuning of the stereo sensitivity in normal adults (F(5,35) = 8.623, p < 0.001). This tuning do not change with different spatial frequencies (F(1,4) = 0.126, p = 0.740).

Conclusions : The motion speed of a visual target limits human stereoscopic performance. This motion/stereo constraint may reflect the processing of stereopsis within the dorsal pathway.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Stimuli and design. There were two depth planes with equal and opposite disparity relative to the plane of the screen. (A) Static (i.e., non-moving) stereoscopic visual stimuli which we used to assess human stereoscopic vision. (B) Dynamic (i.e., moving) stereoscopic visual stimuli which we used to assess human stereoscopic vision. The Gabor elements in this paradigm moved laterally (either left or right, as indicated by the red arrows). (C) Design of experiment 1, 2, and 3. The grey circle represents a single Gabor element.

Stimuli and design. There were two depth planes with equal and opposite disparity relative to the plane of the screen. (A) Static (i.e., non-moving) stereoscopic visual stimuli which we used to assess human stereoscopic vision. (B) Dynamic (i.e., moving) stereoscopic visual stimuli which we used to assess human stereoscopic vision. The Gabor elements in this paradigm moved laterally (either left or right, as indicated by the red arrows). (C) Design of experiment 1, 2, and 3. The grey circle represents a single Gabor element.

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