June 2020
Volume 61, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2020
Psychosocial effects in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandeep Grover
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Ghulam S Hamdani
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Bharani Krishna Mynampati A
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Kumar Sambhav
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Ian Tfirn
    Center for Data Solutions, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Stephanie V Sims
    Psychiatry, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Sandeep Grover, None; Ghulam Hamdani, None; Bharani Mynampati A, None; Kumar Sambhav, None; Ian Tfirn, None; Stephanie Sims, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2020, Vol.61, 3038. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Sandeep Grover, Ghulam S Hamdani, Bharani Krishna Mynampati A, Kumar Sambhav, Ian Tfirn, Stephanie V Sims; Psychosocial effects in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(7):3038.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Several prior studies have explored the psychological effects of eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration, but none in RP. This study investigated factors contributing to anxiety, depression and resilience in patients with visual impairment in RP.

Methods : This prospective study evaluated 34 patients with RP (median age, 55.50; IQR 41-64 yrs). Patients answered questions from the NEI-VFQ for visual function (scale 0-100), PHQ-9 for depression (scale 0-27), CD-RISC for resilience (Scale 0-100) and STAI-FORM X-1 for anxiety (20-100). Besides these questionnaires, the study looked at several other variables including age at diagnosis, level of education, visual acuity, visual fields, and OCT data. Each covariate was tested individually in a simple linear regression model for each outcome (depression and anxiety scores) to determine inclusion for the multivariable model selection process. After forward and backward selection confirmed the final model for each, P-values below .05 were considered statistically significant predictors of the respective outcome.

Results : The mean scores for various parameters were VFQ-25 (median, 58.90, IQR 44.4-66.2), CD-RISC (median, 78; IQR 70-89), PHQ-9 (median, 3.00; IQR 1-6) and STAI-X (32; IQR 23-37). Using multiple linear regressions, existing ‘use of medication’ for any psychiatric condition was a significant predictor for both anxiety (STAI-X, p=0.006) and depression (PHQ-9, p=0.0004). In addition, lower NEI-VFQ scores were a significant predictor for depression (PHQ-9, p=0.011). Age at diagnosis was a significant predictor for anxiety, with the 20-30 age group being most likely to have high anxiety scores (STAI-X, p=0.008).

Conclusions : This study provides a deep insight into the psychosocial aspects of patients with RP. Patients currently on prescribed medication for depression or anxiety should warrant additional attention to evaluate their psychosocial state and counseled accordingly.

This is a 2020 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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