July 2020
Volume 61, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Imaging in the Eye Conference Abstract  |   July 2020
Comparison of cone mosaic metrics between the Spectralis high magnification module (HMM) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Niamh Catherine Wynne
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Heather Heitkotter
    Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Erica N Woertz
    Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Jenna Cava
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Eric Buckland
    Translational Imaging Innovations, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Robert Cooper
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Joseph Carroll
    Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
    Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Niamh Wynne, None; Heather Heitkotter, None; Erica Woertz, None; Jenna Cava, None; Eric Buckland, Translational Imaging Innovations (E); Robert Cooper, Translational Imaging Innovations (I), Translational Imaging Innovations (C), Translational Imaging Innovations (P); Joseph Carroll, Heidelberg Engineering (F), Optovue, Inc (F), Translational Imaging Innovations (I), Translational Imaging Innovations (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01EY017607
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2020, Vol.61, PB0064. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Niamh Catherine Wynne, Heather Heitkotter, Erica N Woertz, Jenna Cava, Eric Buckland, Robert Cooper, Joseph Carroll; Comparison of cone mosaic metrics between the Spectralis high magnification module (HMM) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2020;61(9):PB0064.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Non-invasive imaging of the cone mosaic is typically achieved using adaptive optics (AO)-based devices. However, in eyes with good optical quality the cone mosaic can be resolved without AO. The Heidelberg Spectralis HMM can visualize ocular microstructures resembling cones. Here we compared cone mosaic metrics from AOSLO images to those from Spectralis HMM images.

Methods : Subjects with normal vision and previously acquired AOSLO images had Spectralis wide-field and HMM imaging performed on one eye (Fig. 1). At least 10 HMM images (8° field of view) were obtained at superior and temporal locations ranging 3.5-8.5° from the fovea. Individual HMM images were aligned using affine registration (i2k Retina, Dual Align, LLC). Between 2-20 HMM images were averaged using Image J. A semi-automated cell counting algorithm (Mosaic Analytics, Translational Imaging Innovations) was used to identify photoreceptors within 200 x 200 µm regions of interest at similar eccentricities from the fovea in the AOSLO and the averaged HMM images. Cell density and spacing were calculated from these coordinates and agreement was assessed statistically.

Results : Ten subjects (age range 24-34 years, 1 M, 9 F) had HMM imaging 0.5-6.7 years after their AOSLO images (mean 1.85 years). The visualization of cone mosaic was not uniform across the HMM images. All density and spacing metrics were significantly different between the AOSLO and HMM (Fig. 2). In addition, the level of disagreement increased as the cell density increased.

Conclusions : Though ocular microstructures resembling the cone mosaic can be visualized in vivo using the Spectralis HMM, there remain discrepancies in cone mosaic metrics. Nevertheless, there may be value in utilizing this system to screen subjects for follow-on AOSLO.

This is a 2020 Imaging in the Eye Conference abstract.

 

Figure 1. Differences in retinal images acquired with Spectralis HMM and AOSLO. Shown is a 30° FOV Spectralis near infrared reflectance fundus image (A) and an 8° FOV HMM image from the same subject. A 200 x 200 μm ROI outlined in (B) from the Spectralis HMM image is shown in (C). The corresponding split-detector AOSLO ROI from the same retinal location is shown in (D). Scale bar for panels C and D is 50µm.

Figure 1. Differences in retinal images acquired with Spectralis HMM and AOSLO. Shown is a 30° FOV Spectralis near infrared reflectance fundus image (A) and an 8° FOV HMM image from the same subject. A 200 x 200 μm ROI outlined in (B) from the Spectralis HMM image is shown in (C). The corresponding split-detector AOSLO ROI from the same retinal location is shown in (D). Scale bar for panels C and D is 50µm.

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×