June 2021
Volume 62, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2021
Post hoc Analysis of Clinical Suprachoroidal Injection Experience for Non-infectious Uveitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Milan Shah
    Ophthalmology, Midwest Eye Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Cherry Wan
    Clearside Biomedical Inc, Alpharetta, Georgia, United States
  • Barry Kapik
    Clearside Biomedical Inc, Alpharetta, Georgia, United States
  • Thomas A Ciulla
    Clearside Biomedical Inc, Alpharetta, Georgia, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Milan Shah, Clearside Biomedical, Inc (F); Cherry Wan, Clearside Biomedical, Inc (E), Clearside Biomedical, Inc (I); Barry Kapik, Clearside Biomedical, Inc (E), Clearside Biomedical, Inc (I); Thomas Ciulla, Clearside Biomedical, Inc (E), Clearside Biomedical, Inc (I), Clearside Biomedical, Inc (S)
  • Footnotes
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Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2021, Vol.62, 1192. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Milan Shah, Cherry Wan, Barry Kapik, Thomas A Ciulla; Post hoc Analysis of Clinical Suprachoroidal Injection Experience for Non-infectious Uveitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):1192.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To analyze procedural characteristics of suprachoroidal injections (SCIs) using the SCS Microinjector® in two uveitis trials.The SCS Microinjector reliably delivers drug to the suprachoroidal space (SCS), an alternative administration route for chorioretinal diseases. SCIs are first attempted with a 900µm length needle and switched to 1100µm length if required. Correlations between needle length, baseline patient characteristics, and physician device experience, via survey, are presented.

Methods : Post hoc analyses were performed to assess the relationship between needle length for baseline SCI and patient characteristics. Univariate analysis was conducted with Pearson chi-square analysis for categorial variables and the biserial correlation for continuous variables. Multivariate logistical regression was run to confirm univariate findings. Furthermore, a user experience survey was completed to evaluate real-world SCI experience.

Results : Of the 133 total baseline SCIs,74% were completed with the 900µm needle; the remaining with the 1100µm needle. Univariate analysis revealed no relationship between needle length used and gender, lens status, uveitis sub-type, disease course or onset. Disease duration was statistically correlated with needle length:91% of injections were completed with the 900µm needle for Limited (≤3 months) and 70% for Persistent (>3 months). Age was moderately inversely correlated with needle length. SCI quadrant was statistically related: 82% of supratemporal injections were completed with the 900µm needle compared to 45% of injections administered superonasally. Multivariate logistical regression verified univariate analysis demonstrating the potential impact of age, disease duration and SCI quadrant on needle length. In the user experience survey, over 80% of the physicians responded that SCIs presented no new challenges compared to other types of injections.

Conclusions : While these analyses are retrospective with a small sample size, few patient characteristics were found to correlate with needle length, indicating the procedure can be completed for the majority of patients with the 900µm needle and using a 1100µm needle in remaining patients. This suggests that SCIs with the SCS Microinjector has potential to reliably and repeatably deliver drugs for chorioretinal diseases in an in-office setting.

This is a 2021 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

 

Needle Length Distributions by (a) Injection Quadrant and (b) Disease Duration

Needle Length Distributions by (a) Injection Quadrant and (b) Disease Duration

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