June 2021
Volume 62, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2021
Contrast sensitivity and Higher-Order Aberrations in Keratoconus subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ravid Doron
    Dept. Optometry, Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
  • David P Pinero
    Dept. Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, Universitat d'Alacant, Alicante, Spain
  • Einat Shneor
    Dept. Optometry, Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ravid Doron, None; David Pinero, None; Einat Shneor, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2021, Vol.62, 512. doi:
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      Ravid Doron, David P Pinero, Einat Shneor; Contrast sensitivity and Higher-Order Aberrations in Keratoconus subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):512.

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Abstract

Purpose : Keratoconus (KC) has negative impact on visual quality that is commonly explained by contrast sensitivity reduction. Ocular higher-order aberrations (HOA) are significantly increased in Keratoconus subjects and has been shown to correlate with a decrease in contrast sensitivity. However, the link between contrast sensitivity and HOA in the early stages of the disease is unclear. This study aim was to evaluate contrast sensitivity and HOA in mild KC and subclinical Keratoconus (KCS) subjects.

Methods : Subjects underwent a complete ocular exam including autokeratometry, corneal tomography (Sirius, CSO), autorefraction and ocular HOA (L-80 wave+, Luneau). Diagnosis of KC was based on abnormal topography/tomography and at least one standard KC clinical sign. The criteria for KCS was abnormal/topography and or tomography but without clinical signs. Contrast sensitivity was tested using a psychophysical two-alternative forced-choice Gabor patches in three spatial frequency (6, 9 and 12 cycles/degree). Analysis included both eyes for KC and KCS subjects, but only one eye (randomly assigned) for healthy controls. Data were compared between controls and KC and KCS group and between KC and KCS group with VA of 0.00LogMar using Mann Whitney test and Fisher’s exact test. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared contrast sensitivity for different frequencies. Spearman correlation test was done to analyze the correlation between ocular HOA and contrast sensitivity.

Results : Twenty-two KC and KCS subjects (38 eyes: 28 KC, 10 KCS, mean age 25.6±5.0 years, VA 0.08±0.12 LogMar, 20 had VA of 0.00 LogMar) and 35 healthy control subjects (35 eyes, mean age 25.0±2.6 years, VA 0.00±0.00 LogMar) were included in the study. The control group showed lower ocular HOA (p<0.000) and higher contrast sensitivity for 6, 9 and 12 cpd (p<0.001) compared to KC and KCS group and compared to KC and KCS group with 0.00VA. Most ocular HOA were negatively correlated to contrast sensitivity in all three frequencies for KC and KCS group and for 9 and 12 cpd for KC and KCS with 0.00VA.

Conclusions : KC and KCS subjects with normal VA showed reduction in contrast sensitivity and higher ocular HOA compared to controls. In addition, ocular HOA were negatively correlated to contrast sensitivity for 9 and 12 cpd. This suggests that HOA underlies the poor vision quality of KC subjects.

This is a 2021 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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