June 2021
Volume 62, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2021
Assessment of retinal microvascular alterations in individuals with amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment using optical coherence tomography angiography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dennis Akrobetu
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Cason Robbins
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Sandra S. Stinnett
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Srinath Soundararajan
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Andy Liu
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Kim Johnson
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Dilraj Singh Grewal
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Sharon Fekrat
    Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Dennis Akrobetu, None; Cason Robbins, None; Sandra Stinnett, None; Srinath Soundararajan, None; Andy Liu, None; Kim Johnson, None; Dilraj Grewal, None; Sharon Fekrat, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2021, Vol.62, 2464. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Dennis Akrobetu, Cason Robbins, Sandra S. Stinnett, Srinath Soundararajan, Andy Liu, Kim Johnson, Dilraj Singh Grewal, Sharon Fekrat; Assessment of retinal microvascular alterations in individuals with amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment using optical coherence tomography angiography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):2464.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be categorized into amnestic and non-amnestic subgroups based on the absence or presence of intact working memory. Patients with amnestic MCI have increased likelihood of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease (AD); however, identification of predictive biomarkers distinguishing amnestic and non-amnestic MCI remains ambiguous. This prospective, cross-sectional study utilizes optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) to assess how retinal microvascular density and structure might differ among amnestic and non-amnestic MCI patients.

Methods : One hundred and twelve eyes of 59 amnestic MCI participants, 32 eyes of 17 non-amnestic MCI participants, and 111 eyes of 56 cognitively healthy controls were included in our study. All participants were imaged using the Zeiss Cirrus HD-5000 AngioPlex. OCT-A vessel density (VD) and perfusion density (PD) in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) 3mm and 6mm circles and rings were assessed. Retinal thickness parameters on OCT including retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL), ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL), and central subfield thickness (CST) were also analyzed. Generalized estimating equations accounting for correlation between two eyes of the same subject were utilized for statistical analysis.

Results : Assessment of PD in the 3x3mm inner ETDRS ring revealed a significant decrease in amnestic MCI when compared to non-amnestic MCI (0.29 ± 0.03 vs 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.025), and was significantly lower in amnestic MCI when compared to healthy controls (0.29 ± 0.03 vs 0.39 ± 0.02, p < 0.001), after adjustment for age and sex. Vessel density, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and other retinal thickness parameters (GC-IPL, RNFL, CST) showed no statistically significant difference among or between diagnostic groups.

Conclusions : After adjusting for age and sex, OCT-A perfusion density significantly differed among controls, non-amnestic MCI, and amnestic MCI. Other retinal parameters did not differ between groups after adjusting for covariates. Non-invasive retinal imaging deserves further study as a potential biomarker for diagnosing and classifying subtypes of MCI.

This is a 2021 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×