June 2021
Volume 62, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2021
Short-term videogaming involving multiple-element tracking enhances attentive motion tracking in the periphery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Madeline Curtis
    Chicago College of Optometry, Midwestern University - Downers Grove Campus, Downers Grove, Illinois, United States
  • Oshiobughie Iteghie
    Chicago College of Optometry, Midwestern University - Downers Grove Campus, Downers Grove, Illinois, United States
  • Arijit Chakraborty
    Chicago College of Optometry, Midwestern University - Downers Grove Campus, Downers Grove, Illinois, United States
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Madeline Curtis, None; Oshiobughie Iteghie, None; Arijit Chakraborty, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Midwestern University faculty start-up grant to A.C.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2021, Vol.62, 2741. doi:
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      Madeline Curtis, Oshiobughie Iteghie, Arijit Chakraborty; Short-term videogaming involving multiple-element tracking enhances attentive motion tracking in the periphery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):2741.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Attentive motion tracking is critical to daily living activities, such as navigation and team sports. Previously, we have used perceptual learning to train attentive motion tracking in the periphery for adults with central vision loss and normal vision. Here we investigated if short-term videogaming on FIFA20 that involves tracking multiple elements (players), enhances peripheral multiple objects tracking (MOT), considered a marker of attentive motion tracking. In addition, we also tested whether performance enhancement from such videogame transfers to two related tasks: global motion perception (GMP) and static numerosity judgment (SNJ, static attention), and one unrelated task: global form perception (GFP). Finally, we used two other video games, Need for Speed (involves fast visual motion) and SIMS 4 (involves feature recognition) were used as control games to test any non-specific effect of videogames.

Methods : 15 adults (26.53±4.5y) with normal binocular vision played each video game on PlayStation-4 for 30 mins, across separate sessions, with a 5d wash-out period. Psychophysical thresholds were measured for a random hemifield, pre- and post- videogame in each session. Speed threshold of MOT (8 elements, starting speed 4°/s), motion coherence threshold (GMP; 2AFC direction discrimination for random-dot-kinematograms [100 dots, 6deg/s speed]), form coherence threshold (GFP; 2AFC Glass pattern discrimination), and presentation time threshold for the SNJ task (static frames from the MOT task with 8±1 element presented temporally in 2AFC) were measured. The participants filled a questionnaire to report their videogaming experience.

Results : Only the FIFA 20 significantly improved performance on MOT (15±4.5%, t14=9.7, p=0.009) and SNJ (10.5±3%, t14= -7.4, p=0.02) tasks, but not on GMP and GFP. Furthermore, linear regressions were conducted using the percentage change in MOT and SNJ as the dependent variables, and the type of video game, age, gender, and past gaming experience, as predictor variables. Other than FIFA20, no other variable independently predicted task improvement.

Conclusions : Videogaming involving tracking multiple elements significantly improved peripheral attentive motion tracking. Such improvement transferred to one related task. Our results suggest that videogaming could be considered as a medium to train peripheral attention in patients with central vision loss.

This is a 2021 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

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