June 2021
Volume 62, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2021
Aging-dependent gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with dry eye severity in C57BL/6 male mouse model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chang Ho Yoon
    Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
    Laboratory of Ocular Regenerative Medicine and Immunology, Biomedical Research Institute,, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • JinSuk Ryu
    Laboratory of Ocular Regenerative Medicine and Immunology, Biomedical Research Institute,, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Mee Kum Kim
    Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
    Laboratory of Ocular Regenerative Medicine and Immunology, Biomedical Research Institute,, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Chang Ho Yoon, None; JinSuk Ryu, None; Mee Kum Kim, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (grant number: 2017R1A2B2007209). Also, this work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (No. 2020R1F1A1072506).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2021, Vol.62, 3449. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Chang Ho Yoon, JinSuk Ryu, Mee Kum Kim; Aging-dependent gut microbiome dysbiosis is associated with dry eye severity in C57BL/6 male mouse model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2021;62(8):3449.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Emerging evidence have demonstrated that gut dysbiosis contributes to the pathophysiology or exacerbation of ocular diseases including dry eye disease. However, the relationship between aging-related changes in gut microbiota and dry eye disease have not been elucidated. We investigated the association between aging-dependent microbiome changes and dry eye severity in C57BL/6 male mice.

Methods : Eight-week-old (8W, n=15), one-year-old (1Y, n=10), and two-year-old (2Y, n=8) C57BL/6 male mice were used. Dry eye severity was assessed by corneal staining scores and tear secretion. Bacterial genomic 16s rRNA from feces was analyzed. Main outcomes were microbiome compositional differences among the groups and their correlation to dry eye severity. The Kruskal–Wallis test followed by Dunn’s post hoc test was used for comparison between the three groups. Univariate analysis was used to identify the microbiome composition associated with the dry eye severity. Multivariate analysis was used to eliminate confounding age factors.

Results : In aged mice (1Y and 2Y), corneal staining increased and tear secretion decreased with statistical significance. Gut microbiome α-diversity was not different among the groups. However, β-diversity was significantly different among the groups. In univariate analysis, phylum Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, and genus Alistipes, Bacteroides, Prevotella, Paraprevotella, and Helicobacter were significantly related to dry eye severity. After adjustment of age, multivariate analysis revealed phylum Proteobacteria, Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, and genus Lactobacillus, Alistipes, Prevotella, Paraprevotella, and Helicobacter to be significantly associated with dry eye severity.

Conclusions : Our study suggests that aging-dependent changes in microbiome composition are related to severity of dry eye signs in C57BL/6 male mice.

This is a 2021 ARVO Annual Meeting abstract.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×