June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Anxiety and depression in patients treated for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vikram Ponnusamy
    Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina System, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Patrick Le
    Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina System, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Yang Zhang
    Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina System, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Vikram Ponnusamy None; Patrick Le None; Yang Zhang None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 570 – A0135. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Vikram Ponnusamy, Patrick Le, Yang Zhang; Anxiety and depression in patients treated for proliferative diabetic retinopathy.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):570 – A0135.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Diabetic retinopathy is associated with higher rates of anxiety and depression. We performed a retrospective case-control study to quantify the association between different interventions for the treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and anxiety and depression.

Methods : Medical records from The University of North Carolina Hospital System (2014-2020) were reviewed to identify patients diagnosed with PDR (n = 3572) , anxiety, and depression using ICD-9 and 10 codes. Furthermore, PDR patients that received treatment with intravitreal injection (IVI), pan-retinal photocoagulation laser (PRP), pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), retinal detachment repair (RDR), complex RDR, and removal of silicone oil were identified by CPT codes. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the effect size of an odds ratio (OR) between each mental illness and PDR treatment. Χ2 test of homogeneity and Fischer-exact test were used to determine statistical significance between groups. All P values received Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons.

Results : Out of 3572 PDR patients, 648 had anxiety and 979 depression. IVI had lower odds of comorbid anxiety when compared to untreated PDR patients (OR 0.835, 0.738-0.944, P < 0.001). Similarly, there were reduced odds for comorbid depression when comparing between patients who received IVI (OR 0.584, 0.525-0.650, P < 0.001), PPV with endolaser (OR 0.725, 0.604-0.870, P < 0.001), or PRP (OR 0.589, 0.513-0.678, P < 0.001) to patients who had no intervention for PDR. However, RDR (OR 1.759, 1.044-2.966, P < 0.001) and complex RDR (OR 1.451, 1.032-2.040, P < 0.001) were associated with increased odds of comorbid anxiety when compared to patients with untreated PDR.

Conclusions : These findings further elucidate the relationship between mental health and diabetic retinopathy. Patients receiving surgical and non-surgical interventions for PDR have decreased odds of having comorbid anxiety and depression, with the exception of retinal detachment repair, which is associated with higher odds of anxiety. These findings emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary care in managing patients with diabetic retinal detachments.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×