June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Improving Meridional Acuity Deficits in Astigmatism-Related Amblyopia by Grating Acuity Training
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle Marie Antonucci
    University of California Berkeley School of Optometry, Berkeley, California, United States
  • Tsz Wing Leung
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
  • Betty Zhu Li
    University of California Berkeley School of Optometry, Berkeley, California, United States
  • Chea-Su Kee
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
  • Dennis M Levi
    University of California Berkeley School of Optometry, Berkeley, California, United States
  • Roger Li
    Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Michelle Antonucci None; Tsz Wing Leung None; Betty Li None; Chea-Su Kee None; Dennis Levi None; Roger Li None
  • Footnotes
    Support  HMRF 02160117, PolyU G-U994
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 1231 – A0339. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Michelle Marie Antonucci, Tsz Wing Leung, Betty Zhu Li, Chea-Su Kee, Dennis M Levi, Roger Li; Improving Meridional Acuity Deficits in Astigmatism-Related Amblyopia by Grating Acuity Training. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):1231 – A0339.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate whether practicing a full-contrast grating acuity task modifies resolution acuity in adults with astigmatism-related amblyopia.

Methods : We developed a psychophysical test to measure grating acuity. In each trial, a full- contrast sinusoidal grating target (diameter=0.7 deg) was displayed randomly at one of four locations on the monitor screen. The visual task was to indicate the location of the target grating. The spatial frequency of the grating stimuli was controlled using an adaptive staircase technique (3-down 1-up, converged to 79% correct). The mean of the last 12 reversal points was taken as grating acuity. The mean luminance of the grating targets was 70 cd/m2. In the training phase, the participants were required to repeatedly practice the grating acuity task for 10 sessions with the amblyopic eye. The grating orientation was set to the axis of the negative cylindrical correction for myopic astigmatism. Audio feedback was provided for each response. Each participant had given roughly ten thousand responses at the end of the experiment.

Results : Ten adults with astigmatism-related amblyopia participated. Over the course of the grating acuity training, our participants showed rapid recovery from meridional acuity deficits. The meridional anisotropy of grating acuity became significantly normalized from 1.28 to 1.06 after the intervention (paired t=4.757, p=0.001). All participants showed a significant improvement in grating acuity of the amblyopic eye for the trained grating orientation (mean improvement, 19%; one sample t=8.228, p<0.001), and the learning effects did not transfer to the untrained orthogonal grating orientation (one sample t=4.194, p=0.683).

Conclusions : Practicing grating detection near cut-off spatial frequency can improve meridional acuity deficits in astigmatism-related amblyopia. Our findings characterized the learning profile and orientational specificity of grating acuity training. We are currently working towards standardizing this new technique for treatment of meridional amblyopia.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

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