June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Primary ophthalmic hospitalizations among individuals experiencing homelessness in the United States, 2016-2018
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michal Turkiewicz
    Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • Archis Bhandarkar
    Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Namrata Arya
    Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
    Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • Mohamad Bydon
    Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Joanne Shen
    Department of Opthalmology, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Scottsdale, Arizona, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Michal Turkiewicz None; Archis Bhandarkar None; Namrata Arya None; Mohamad Bydon None; Joanne Shen None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 2141 – A0169. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Michal Turkiewicz, Archis Bhandarkar, Namrata Arya, Mohamad Bydon, Joanne Shen; Primary ophthalmic hospitalizations among individuals experiencing homelessness in the United States, 2016-2018. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):2141 – A0169.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : There is little data characterizing ophthalmic illness among individuals experiencing homelessness, who face health hazards distinct from the general population. We quantified rates of hospitalization for ophthalmic disease and injury among individuals experiencing homelessness in the United States, using the National Inpatient Sample(NIS) database.

Methods : We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis using recent data from the NIS database(2016-2018). This database is the largest all-payor inpatient care database and provides a stratified random sample representing 97% of discharges in the United States. Individuals with primary ophthalmic illness were identified by filtering for those with an ICD-10 code related to disease of the eye or adnexa, excluding diabetic eye disease. Housing status was identified using ICD-10 codes for homelessness. Data analysis was conducted using R software.

Results : The most common diagnoses among homeless individuals hospitalized for ophthalmic disease are: corneal ulcer(16.8%), orbital floor fracture(13.4%), laceration of the eyelid(9.1%), orbital cellulitis(5.9%), and endophthalmitis(2.5%). This distribution differs from the most common diagnoses among the general population. Our results show higher rates of trauma-related diagnoses among homeless individuals(38%) when compared to ophthalmic hospitalizations among the general population(23%). In addition, there is a lower proportion of optic neuritis(7.1% to 1.2%), and diplopia/visual disturbances(9.2% to 2.8%) in the homeless population compared to the general population.

Conclusions : This is the first published data on ophthalmologic illness requiring hospitalization among homeless individuals. Our study shows trauma-related hospitalizations at an increased rate among the homeless population, with lower rates of illness with neurological cause. This is attributable to homeless individuals facing greater risk of trauma and infection. An effective intervention might be the development of education materials and programs teaching causes and signs of eye trauma and infection, to enable prevention and quicker treatment.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×