June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile ocular blood volume demonstrates a decrease in the supine position in healthy subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aysenur Musaogullari
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Cynthia J Roberts
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Carol B Toris
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Jesse Gilbert
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • David Reed
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Vikas Gulati
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Arthur J Sit
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Sayoko Eileen Moroi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Aysenur Musaogullari None; Cynthia Roberts Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems AG, Code C (Consultant/Contractor), Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Code C (Consultant/Contractor), Heidelberg Engineering, Inc, Code R (Recipient); Carol Toris None; Jesse Gilbert None; David Reed None; Vikas Gulati None; Arthur Sit None; Sayoko Moroi NIH, Code F (Financial Support), Wolters Kluwer Health, Code R (Recipient)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01 EY022124
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 4022 – A0407. doi:
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      Aysenur Musaogullari, Cynthia J Roberts, Carol B Toris, Jesse Gilbert, David Reed, Vikas Gulati, Arthur J Sit, Sayoko Eileen Moroi; Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile ocular blood volume demonstrates a decrease in the supine position in healthy subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):4022 – A0407.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Ocular blood flow is important for eye health and for understanding the pathogenesis of ocular diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to a test a simple, noninvasive method to assess pulsatile ocular blood volume (POBV) in healthy subjects and to determine effects of posture changes and glaucoma medications.

Methods : A subset of data was evaluated from a prospective, randomized crossover-design of glaucoma medications (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04412096) in healthy subjects. Aqueous humor dynamic measurements were made at baseline, after 1 week of timolol 0.5% dosed twice daily, and after 1 week of latanoprost 0.005% dosed nightly. The treatments were separated by a 6-week washout period. Study criteria for this subset analysis included high quality recordings of intraocular pressure (IOP) by pneumatonometry with two or more pulses measured at each visit in sitting and then supine positions. Thirty-two eyes from 16 subjects, ages 44 to 72 years, met study criteria. Ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) was defined as the IOP difference between diastolic (IOPdia) and systolic (IOPsys) values. POBV was calculated as OPA/IOPdia, as previously described. Student t-test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was used with significance threshold at p<0.017 to compare the effects of posture and under medication treatment conditions.

Results : At baseline, there was a significant increase in supine versus sitting position in IOPsys (16.7 ± 2.3 mmHg to 21.4 ± 2.4 mmHg, p<0.0001), IOPdia (14.4 ± 2.2 mmHg to 19.5 ± 2.2 mmHg, p<0.0001), and mean IOP (15.5 ± 2.2 mmHg to 20.5 ± 2.2 mmHg, p<0.0001). Calculated POBV was significantly decreased in supine versus sitting positions (0.17 ± 0.06 vs. 0.10 ± 0.04, p<0.001). These effects were similar at baseline and after treatments with timolol or latanoprost. The position-related POBV change was not affected by treatment or order of treatment.

Conclusions : In the supine position of healthy adults, IOP increased and POBV calculated by OPA/IOPdia decreased relative to the sitting position. Our future studies will compare POBV in patients with glaucoma where the autoregulation of retinal blood flow may be affected, to investigate whether changes in pulsatile blood volume in the supine position may play a role in glaucoma pathogenesis. Changes from glaucoma treatments also will be investigated.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

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