June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Comparison of peripheral visual field defects on static and kinetic visual field testing in Asian versus Caucasian subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jon David Hammer
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Sepideh Jamali Dogahe
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Seyedmostafa Sadegh Mousavi
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Cheryl Khanna
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jon Hammer None; Sepideh Jamali Dogahe None; Seyedmostafa Sadegh Mousavi None; Cheryl Khanna None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Mayo Clinic Foundation for research support
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 1258 – A0398. doi:
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      Jon David Hammer, Sepideh Jamali Dogahe, Seyedmostafa Sadegh Mousavi, Cheryl Khanna; Comparison of peripheral visual field defects on static and kinetic visual field testing in Asian versus Caucasian subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):1258 – A0398.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To compare peripheral visual field testing in Asian vs. Caucasian subjects without ocular pathology

Methods : Subjects with no identifiable ocular pathology and normal optical coherence tomography tests were included. A previously validated three-dimensional facial reconstruction model was used to predict peripheral visual field defects. Static 60-4 Humphrey visual field testing and kinetic visual field testing were performed, and results were compared between the Asian and Caucasian groups.

Results : Thirty-four eyes from 17 healthy subjects were enrolled including 12 Asians of Chinese descent (5 males, 7 females) and 5 Caucasians (2 males, 3 females). On kinetic visual field testing, the Asian group had significantly increased mean nasal (62.7 vs 57.2 degrees OD, p=0.02; 62.3 vs 55.2 degrees OS, p=0.005), and inferonasal (59.3 vs 52.4 degrees OD, p=0.02; 60.7 vs 55.6 degrees OS, p=0.01) peripheral field of vision compared to the Caucasian group in both right and left eyes. No significant difference was noted temporally and inferotemporally between the two groups. On static 60-4 testing, the Asian group had higher mean inferonasal quadrant threshold values that did not reach statistical significance (443 vs 380 dB OD, p=0.07; 431 vs 385 dB OS, p=0.18) while the inferotemporal quadrant threshold values were very similar between the two groups (504 vs 508 dB OD, p=0.66; 506 vs 511 dB OS, p=0.71).

Conclusions : Caucasian subjects in this study had a reduction in nasal field compared to Asian control patients, likely due to differences in facial contour, specifically a more prominent nasal contour in Caucasian subjects. This difference in facial contour among races may be relevant in development of normative 60-4 data.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

 

Overlay of kinetic visual fields for the right and left eye of each subject in both the Asian and Caucasion groups. The average values for the right and left eye of each group is represented by the red lines.

Overlay of kinetic visual fields for the right and left eye of each subject in both the Asian and Caucasion groups. The average values for the right and left eye of each group is represented by the red lines.

 

Humphrey 60-4 visual fields showing average thresholds for the right and left eye of all subjects in both the Asian and Caucasion groups.

Humphrey 60-4 visual fields showing average thresholds for the right and left eye of all subjects in both the Asian and Caucasion groups.

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