June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Comparing the Visual Acuity of Zebrafish Using Analog and Digital Systems
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tatevik Takhmazyan
    College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California, United States
  • D Joshua Cameron
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Tatevik Takhmazyan None; D Joshua Cameron None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 2562 – F0516. doi:
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      Tatevik Takhmazyan, D Joshua Cameron; Comparing the Visual Acuity of Zebrafish Using Analog and Digital Systems. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):2562 – F0516.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Danio rerio (zebrafish) are often used as a model to study visual physiology. Previous methodologies utilize an analog system to assess binocular and monocular visual acuities using the optokinetic response (OKR); however, an analog device presents with disadvantages, such as being multi-step, inefficient, and containing paper components prone to water damage. Thus, we have developed a digital system to observe the optokinetic response in zebrafish and effectively measure visual acuity.

Methods : Adult zebrafish were maintained under standard conditions and visual acuity was measured using an analog OKR device. Similarly, visual acuity was measured using a new digital OKR device. Acuity measurements were measured using high contrast, black-and-white stripes as well as colored stripes. A comparison between the measured visual acuities was completed using a paired t-test.

Results : The average analog visual acuity obtained using black-and-white stripes was 0.74 cycles per degree (cpd), while the average digital visual acuity was 0.48 cpd, as demonstrated in Figure 1. The analog system yielded significantly higher visual acuity in comparison to the digital system (p<0.05, n=10; Student’s T-test). Likewise, visual acuity using red, blue and green produced similar results—the analog system had an overall higher visual acuity threshold in comparison to the digital system. Despite these differences, the analog and digital systems show a similar trend in visual acuity measurements, as seen in Figure 2.

Conclusions : Here, we demonstrate that visual acuity trends are consistent among analog and digital systems in both black-and-white and colored stimuli. Thus, an improved digital model can be beneficial for quickly evaluating visual response in adult zebrafish and facilitating disease-related research.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

 

Figure 1: Average Visual Acuities The chart demonstrates the calculated visual acuities with both the digital and analog system and displays the average visual acuity in cpd. The average analog visual acuity is 0.74 cycles per degree and the average visual acuity with the digital system is 0.48 cycles per degree (n=10).

Figure 1: Average Visual Acuities The chart demonstrates the calculated visual acuities with both the digital and analog system and displays the average visual acuity in cpd. The average analog visual acuity is 0.74 cycles per degree and the average visual acuity with the digital system is 0.48 cycles per degree (n=10).

 

Figure 2: Digital and Analog Independent Visual Acuities The graph shows independent visual acuities measured in a sample of 10 fish. Each point represents one fish and visual acuity is measured in cycles per degree (cpd).

Figure 2: Digital and Analog Independent Visual Acuities The graph shows independent visual acuities measured in a sample of 10 fish. Each point represents one fish and visual acuity is measured in cycles per degree (cpd).

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