June 2022
Volume 63, Issue 7
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2022
Disability Glare Quantified Rapidly with AIM (Angular Indication Measurement) Glare Acuity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan Skerswetat
    Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Anna Boruta
    Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Peter J Bex
    Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jan Skerswetat PerZeption Inc., Code I (Personal Financial Interest), Northeastern University, Boston, Code P (Patent); Anna Boruta None; Peter Bex PerZeption Inc., Code I (Personal Financial Interest), Northeastern University, Boston, Code P (Patent)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grant EY029713
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2022, Vol.63, 2558 – F0512. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jan Skerswetat, Anna Boruta, Peter J Bex; Disability Glare Quantified Rapidly with AIM (Angular Indication Measurement) Glare Acuity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2022;63(7):2558 – F0512.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Disability glare is a consequence of straylight that causes discomfort and an objective perceptual deficit. The novel computer-based AIM Glare Acuity method was used to measure subjective and objective performance under standard and simulated straylight conditions.

Methods : AIM Acuity(Figure 1) entailed a sequence of 2 trials, each containing a 4*4 grid of 6° cells displayed on a 32” 4K monitor, using a gray background(3.4 cd/m2). Each cell contained a dark Landolt-type C surrounded by either a 0.1° thin dark(0.2 cd/m2; Baseline), 1° thick dark(Mask control), or 1° thick light(195 cd/m2; Glare) ring. Each C was randomly rotated and varied in size, spanning easy to difficult sizes. An adaptive algorithm updated the sizes in the 2nd trial based on the participant’s responses during trial 1. Participants indicated the location of each C’s gap via mouse click on the surrounding ring. The angle between the true and reported C orientation as a function of stimulus size that was fit with a cumulative gaussian function, from which ETDRS-equivalent acuity was also calculated(Figure 1). After each trial, participants indicated their subjective glare experience via continuous sliders, ranging from “No glare” to “Strong glare”. After 5 min dark adaptation, 18 normally-sighted participants(18 years median age) performed the task using their dominant eye without(control) or with a Bangerter 0.3 filter(simulated straylight condition) at 60cm distance. ANOVAs and planned comparisons determined effects between conditions.

Results : AIM Glare Acuity took 39sec(SD=17sec) to complete. Visual acuity was significantly lower with Glare rings for both control and simulated straylight conditions, but with a much stronger effect for the latter(Figure 2). No significant differences were found between Baseline and Mask dark rings for any condition. Subjective experiences of glare were significantly higher in glare than control ring conditions.

Conclusions : Visual acuity and subjective discomfort reports were significantly impaired by AIM Glare rings and the effects were amplified by stimulated straylight. Dark mask control rings did not affect acuity or discomfort, suggesting that performance was impaired by disability glare rather than contrast masking. AIM Glare Acuity may therefore be suitable to investigate disability glare in <40 sec in clinical populations, e.g. patients pre-/post- refractive or cataract surgery.

This abstract was presented at the 2022 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Denver, CO, May 1-4, 2022, and virtually.

 

 

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