June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Molecular characterizations and comparisons of retinal cell types among human and non-human primates
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yi-Rong Peng
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stein Eye Institute, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
    Department of Neurobiology, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yi-Rong Peng None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development Awards, Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Awards in Neuroscience, Knights Templar Eye Foundation Career Starter Grant, ARVO/Genentech AMD Research Fellowship, UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center (BSCRC) Research Award
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 509. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Yi-Rong Peng; Molecular characterizations and comparisons of retinal cell types among human and non-human primates. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):509.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Presentation Description : The organization of the retina is generally conserved among mammalian species, but there are also species-specific modifications of the retinal circuit. Of note, human and non-human primates have a specialized area–the fovea–at the center of their retinas. The circuitry in the fovea endows primates with high visual acuity that allows them to fulfill their daily activities. Diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, impair the structure and functional integrity of the fovea, which cause compromised vision and possibly blindness. Non-human primates have been used as a favorable animal model to study visual diseases due to their close similarity in retinal organization to humans. Thus, it is indispensable to closely compare retinal cell types between human and non-human primates in order to translate the findings from non-human primates to human patients. In this talk, I will present molecular characterizations of retinal cell types using single-cell RNA-sequencing in three primate species: human, macaque, and marmoset. I will also describe our findings using genome-wide transcriptome comparisons to identify the convergent and divergent molecular features of cell types among the three species. Lastly, I will describe the potential mechanism that mediates the formation of the fovea in primates.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

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