June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Effect of word predictability on reading performance in normally sighted readers with a simulated scotoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eole Lapeyre
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azu, France
  • Livia Cabasson
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azu, France
  • Carlos Aguilar
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azu, France
  • Françoise Vitu
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azu, France
  • Nuria Gala
    Laboratoire Parole et Langage, Aix en Provence, Région Sud, France
  • Aurelie Calabrese
    Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azu, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Eole Lapeyre None; Livia Cabasson None; Carlos Aguilar None; Françoise Vitu None; Nuria Gala None; Aurelie Calabrese None
  • Footnotes
    Support  PhD fellowship from the French Ministry of Research & Technology
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 2803. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Eole Lapeyre, Livia Cabasson, Carlos Aguilar, Françoise Vitu, Nuria Gala, Aurelie Calabrese; Effect of word predictability on reading performance in normally sighted readers with a simulated scotoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):2803.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Visual factors have long been investigated to try and restore functional reading in individuals with central field loss (CFL). However, none have clearly led to clinically significant improvements. Recently, psycholinguistic factors (word frequency and orthographic neighborhood size) have been studied in the context of low vision, showing an undocumented influence on reading abilities with CFL. Here, we investigated the specific effect of word predictability in context.

Methods : 29 normally sighted young adults read aloud short sentences in the presence of a simulated gaze-contingent central scotoma. Participants read 304 sentences presented within 19 blocks and had to adjust to the presence of the scotoma in order to read. Each sentence contained a primer and a target word, which were either semantically related or not, providing a range of predictability in context values. Sentences were displayed using self-paced reading paradigm. For each target word, reading time, accuracy, number and duration of fixations were collected. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models to inspect the effect of word predictability on these outcome measures across the adaptation process.

Results : Reading time was significantly longer for low predictability words during the 1st block, with an average value of 2.6s, against 1.6s for high predictability words (p<0.001). During the last block, reading time was significantly decreased (p<0.001) but showed no significant difference between high and low predictability. Similarly, as predictability increased, the number of fixations decreased significantly by 40% during the 1st block (p<0.001). With practice, this difference became non-significant, despite a significant decrease in fixation number in both conditions (p<0.001).

Conclusions : As reported before with normal readers, predictability significantly affects reading speed. This effect is modulated by the amount of practice with a simulated scotoma. We concluded that prior to their adaptation to the scotoma, participants rely on semantical inference, leading to a strong effect of predictability. As they adapt, their need for inference decreases, reducing the amplitude of the predictability effect. Finally, our results show that word predictability influences reading time by modifying oculo-motor patterns of the reader. These results will help better understand the reading deficit induced by CFL.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×