June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Measuring refractive errors using laser speckle: A pilot study of a potential low-cost approach to screening children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emiliano Teran
    Department of Physic, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
    Centro de Investigación y Docencia en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
  • Russell L Woods
    Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Efrain Romo-Garcia
    Centro de Investigación y Docencia en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
  • Ruth Acuna-Maldonado
    Centro de Investigación y Docencia en Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Emiliano Teran None; Russell Woods None; Efrain Romo-Garcia None; Ruth Acuna-Maldonado None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Autonomous University of Sinaloa
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 4985. doi:
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      Emiliano Teran, Russell L Woods, Efrain Romo-Garcia, Ruth Acuna-Maldonado; Measuring refractive errors using laser speckle: A pilot study of a potential low-cost approach to screening children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):4985.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Screening of children for refractive errors in low-resource settings would benefit from a reliable and accurate low-cost approach. The laser speckle technique has that potential. Here we examined accuracy in a group of young adults.

Methods : We measured the refractive status of 16 subjects (8 women; median 22, range 18 to 30 years) under cycloplegia (cyclopentolate 1%) with: (1) autorefraction (RedSun model ARK7610); and (2) laser speckle. For laser speckle, we used a He-Ne laser (632 nm, 20mW) and a 67D lens to project a 10cm-diameter speckle pattern on a white surface. Subjects, viewing from 3m, indicated direction of motion in the presence of trial lenses, allowing measurements of the spherical and cylindrical components. We used the spherical equivalent to compare refractive errors measured with the two methods.

Results : Refractive errors measured with the autorefractor ranged from -6.00 D to +2.25 D. Using the Bland Altman (1986) approach, the limits of agreement were -2.49 D to +1.94 D. There was no tendency for differences to vary with refractive error (p=0.25). Importantly for screening, the slope of the regression line was 1.1, indicating that there was no substantial trend for under- or over-estimation using laser speckle.

Conclusions : Laser speckle provided refractive error measurements consistent with the autorefractor, acting as the gold standard for refraction. Thus, laser speckle has the potential for use as a screening method, with particular potential value due to its low cost in low resources environments. The next steps are to test the laser speckle technique in children and without cycloplegia.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

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