June 2023
Volume 64, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2023
Acanthamoeba aggregate and encyst on silicone hydrogel contact lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monica Crary
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Allison Campolo
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Reed Pifer
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Rhonda Walters
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Chris Rice
    Purdue University System, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Megan Thomas
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Elise Miller
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Valerie Harris
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Jamie King
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • S. Paul Shannon
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Brian Patterson
    Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Monica Crary Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Allison Campolo Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Reed Pifer Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Rhonda Walters Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Chris Rice Alcon Laboratories, Code C (Consultant/Contractor), Purdue University, Code E (Employment); Megan Thomas Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Elise Miller Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Valerie Harris Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Jamie King Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); S. Paul Shannon Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment); Brian Patterson Alcon Laboratories, Code E (Employment)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2023, Vol.64, 162. doi:
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      Monica Crary, Allison Campolo, Reed Pifer, Rhonda Walters, Chris Rice, Megan Thomas, Elise Miller, Valerie Harris, Jamie King, S. Paul Shannon, Brian Patterson; Acanthamoeba aggregate and encyst on silicone hydrogel contact lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2023;64(8):162.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious corneal infection associated with contact lens usage and contaminated water contact. No studies have shown the potential for contact lenses to play a role beyond vector in this infection. Here, we investigated clinical strains of Acanthamoeba using different contact lens materials to draw conclusions on how the interaction of Acanthamoeba with contact lenses may contribute to risk.

Methods : Acanthamoeba trophozoites from strains of T3, T4, and T5 genotypes were inoculated on six silicone hydrogel contact lenses (lehfilcon A, lotrafilcon B, comfilcon A, senofilcon A, samfilcon A, and fanfilcon A) and allowed to adhere. Time-lapse videos were created for up to three days to observe cell behavior on contact lenses and determine cell size and count. Acanthamoeba spheroids were analyzed using confocal microscopy to determine trophozoite and cyst subpopulations over time. Finally, Acanthamoeba spheroids’ disinfection resistance on lenses was compared to individual trophozoites using multipurpose solutions.

Results : Particle count and size were examined: lower count and higher size indicating more aggregation as trophozoites join in a cluster. For all strains, all lens materials tested demonstrated a significantly lower Acanthamoeba particle count than lehfilcon A and lotrafilcon B (p<0.05) from timepoints 2 hours to 12 hours. Similarly, all lens materials demonstrated a significantly higher Acanthamoeba particle size than lehfilcon A and lotrafilcon B from 3 hours through 72 hours (p<0.05). Overall, this demonstrated that the lehfilcon A and lotrafilcon B material allowed significantly less aggregation. Confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of cysts at the center of contact lens-induced spheroids. Finally, lenses with spheroids showed higher Acanthamoeba survival rate to disinfection with the three most common biocides compared to lenses with non-aggregating trophozoites.

Conclusions : Our research establishes that many contact lens materials induce Acanthamoeba to aggregate. This aggregation results in rapid encystment. Encystment is a major hindrance to disinfection by multipurpose solutions which are largely ineffective against Acanthamoeba cysts. This aggregation behavior allows Acanthamoeba to resist disinfection by multipurpose solutions on lenses and may decrease the safety margin for contact lens wearers when good contact lens hygiene practices are not followed.

This abstract was presented at the 2023 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 2023.

 

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